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A common framework for conservation planning: Linking individual and metapopulation models [Chapter 7]

Posted date: August 01, 2018
Publication Year: 
1996
Authors: Noon, Barry R.; McKelvey, Kevin S.
Publication Series: 
Book Chapter
Source: In: McCullough, Dale Richard, ed. Metapopulations and Wildlife Conservation. Washington, D.C.: Island Press. p. 139-165.

Abstract

Many populations exhibit pronounced spatial structure: dispersed areas of high population density embedded in areas of low density, with population centers connected through dispersal. This recognition has led many conservation biologists to embrace the metapopulation concept (Levins 1970) as the appropriate paradigm for reserve design structures (reviewed in Hanski 1991 and Harrison 1994). This concept seems appropriate for those species that have patchy distributions because the critical resources on which they depend are distributed in this fashion. This paradigm may be less applicable, however, to species that historically have had a more or less uniform distribution of individuals across the landscape. If such species are faced with threats to their persistence, is a metapopulation reserve structure appropriate for their conservation? Or is the tailoring of reserve design to a single paradigm similar to attempting to force a square peg into a round hole?

Citation

Noon, Barry R.; McKelvey, Kevin S. 1996. A common framework for conservation planning: Linking individual and metapopulation models [Chapter 7]. In: McCullough, Dale Richard, ed. Metapopulations and Wildlife Conservation. Washington, D.C.: Island Press. p. 139-165.