You are here

Climate-based seed transfer of a widespread shrub: population shifts, restoration strategies, and the trailing edge

Posted date: December 17, 2018
Publication Year: 
2018
Authors: Richardson, Bryce A.; Chaney, Lindsay
Publication Series: 
Scientific Journal (JRNL)
Source: Ecological Applications. 28(8): 2165-2174.

Abstract

Genetic resources have to be managed appropriately to mitigate the impact of climate change. For many wildland plants, conservation will require knowledge of the climatic factors affecting intraspecific genetic variation to minimize maladaptation. Knowledge of the interaction between traits and climate can focus management resources on vulnerable populations, provide guidance for seed transfer, and enhance fitness and resilience under changing climates. In this study, traits of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) were examined among common gardens located in different climates. We focus on two subspecies, wyomingensis and tridentata, that occupy the most imperiled warm-dry spectrum of the sagebrush biome. Populations collected across the sagebrush biome were recorded for flower phenology and survival. Mixed-effects models examined each trait to evaluate genetic variation, environmental effects, and adaptive breadth of populations. Climate variables derived from population- source locations were significantly associated with these traits (P

Citation

Richardson, Bryce A.; Chaney, Lindsay. 2018. Climate-based seed transfer of a widespread shrub: population shifts, restoration strategies, and the trailing edge. Ecological Applications. 28(8): 2165-2174.