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Climate adaptation [Chapter 3]

Posted date: August 14, 2019
Publication Year: 
2019
Authors: Chambers, Jeanne C.; Evers, Louisa; Joyce, Linda A.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Crist, Michele R.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Phillips, Susan L.; Prentice, Karen L.; Wiechman, Lief A., eds. Science framework for conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome: Linking the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy to long-term strategic conservation actions. Part 2. Management applications. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-389. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 37-62.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Management actions that enable adaptation to climate change and promote resilience to disturbance are becoming increasingly important in the sagebrush biome. In recent decades temperatures have increased, growing seasons have lengthened, and in many areas the timing and amount of precipitation has changed (Chambers et al. 2017 [hereafter, Part 1], section 4; Kunkel et al. 2013a,b,c). Global climate change models are used to project future changes in temperature and precipitation based on relative concentration pathways of likely emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other trace gases and information on the Earth’s surfaces and oceans. These models project continued temperature increases and additional changes in precipitation throughout the remainder of the century, although the magnitude and rate of change differ based on the relative concentration pathway used (Part 1, section 4; Kunkel et al. 2013a,b,c).

Citation

Chambers, Jeanne C.; Evers, Louisa; Joyce, Linda A. 2019. Climate adaptation [Chapter 3]. In: Crist, Michele R.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Phillips, Susan L.; Prentice, Karen L.; Wiechman, Lief A., eds. Science framework for conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome: Linking the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy to long-term strategic conservation actions. Part 2. Management applications. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-389. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 37-62.