You are here

A chronosequence feasibility assessment of emergency fire rehabilitation records within the intermountain western United States-final report to the Joint Fire Science Program-Project 08-S-08

Posted date: December 03, 2009
Publication Year: 
2009
Authors: Knutson, Kevin C.; Pyke, David A.; Wirth, Troy A.; Pilliod, David S.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Chambers, Jeanne C.
Publication Series: 
Miscellaneous Publication
Source: Open-File Report 2009-1099. Reston, VA: U.S. Geological Survey. 20 p.

Abstract

Department of the Interior (DOI) bureaus have invested heavily (for example, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) spent more than $60 million in fiscal year 2007) in seeding vegetation for emergency stabilization and burned area rehabilitation of non-forested arid lands over the past 10 years. The primary objectives of these seedings commonly are to (1) reduce the post-fire dominance of non-native annual grasses, such as cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) and red brome (Bromus rubens); (2) minimize the probability of recurrent fire; and (3) ultimately produce desirable vegetation characteristics (for example, ability to recover following disturbance [resilience], resistance to invasive species, and a capacity to support a diverse flora and fauna). Although these projects historically have been monitored to varying extents, land managers currently lack scientific evidence to verify whether seeding arid and semiarid lands achieves desired objectives. Given the amount of resources dedicated to post-fire seeding projects, a synthesis of information determining the factors that result in successful treatments is critically needed.

Citation

Knutson, Kevin C.; Pyke, David A.; Wirth, Troy A.; Pilliod, David S.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Chambers, Jeanne C. 2009. A chronosequence feasibility assessment of emergency fire rehabilitation records within the intermountain western United States-final report to the Joint Fire Science Program-Project 08-S-08. Open-File Report 2009-1099. Reston, VA: U.S. Geological Survey. 20 p.