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Chapter 5: Wolverine

Posted date: May 24, 2007
Publication Year: 
1994
Authors: Banci, Vivian
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Ruggiero, Leonard F.; Aubry, Keith B.; Buskirk, Steven W.; Lyon, L. Jack; Zielinski, William J., tech. eds. The scientific basis for conserving forest carnivores: American marten, fisher, lynx, and wolverine in the western United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-254. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. p. 99-127
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Abstract

The wolverine (Gulo gulo) is the largest-bodied terrestrial mustelid. Its distribution is circumpolar; it occupies the tundra, taiga, and forest zones of North America and Eurasia (Wilson 1982). North American wolverines are considered the same species as those in Eurasia. They are usually thought of as creatures of northern wilderness and remote mountain ranges. In fact, wolverines extend as far south as California and Colorado and as far east as the coast of Labrador, although low densities are characteristic of the species.

Citation

Banci, Vivian 1994. Chapter 5: Wolverine. In: Ruggiero, Leonard F.; Aubry, Keith B.; Buskirk, Steven W.; Lyon, L. Jack; Zielinski, William J., tech. eds. The scientific basis for conserving forest carnivores: American marten, fisher, lynx, and wolverine in the western United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-254. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. p. 99-127