You are here

Chapter 3: Providing water and forage in the Salt-Verde River Basin

Posted date: June 12, 2009
Publication Year: 
1999
Authors: DeBano, Leonard F.; Baker, Malchus B. Jr.; 
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Baker, Jr., Malchus B., compiler. History of watershed research in the Central Arizona Highlands. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-29. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 13-18.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

The Salt-Verde River Basin, covering about 8.4 million acres of the Central Arizona Highlands, supplies most of the water for the Salt River Valley in addition to providing other multiple use values. Mixed conifer, ponderosa pine forests, and a portion of the pinyon-juniper woodlands predominantly occupy the higher-elevation watersheds. Chaparral shrublands occupy a wide range of elevations, experience varied annual precipitation amounts, and overlap major portions of the pinyon-juniper woodland and semidesert grassland types (figure 2). Management of these shrublands for increased forage and water production, and reduction in sediment production and its subsequent transport into Roosevelt Reservoir, has been of major interest to people in the Central Arizona Highlands and Salt-Verde River valley since the early 1900s.

Citation

DeBano, Leonard F.; Baker, Malchus B., Jr.; Gottfried, Gerald J. 1999. Chapter 3: Providing water and forage in the Salt-Verde River Basin. In: Baker, Jr., Malchus B., compiler. History of watershed research in the Central Arizona Highlands. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-29. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 13-18.