You are here

Chapter 3: Plant invasions and fire regimes

Posted date: April 16, 2009
Publication Year: 
2008
Authors: Brooks, Matthew L.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Zouhar, Kristin; Smith, Jane Kapler; Sutherland, Steve; Brooks, Matthew L. Wildland fire in ecosystems: fire and nonnative invasive plants. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 6. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 33-46
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

The alteration of fire regimes is one of the most significant ways that plant invasions can affect ecosystems (Brooks and others 2004; D'Antonio 2000; D'Antonio and Vitousek 1992; Vitousek 1990). The suites of changes that can accompany an invasion include both direct effects of invaders on native plants through competitive interference, and indirect effects on all taxa through changes in habitat characteristics, biogeochemical cycles, and disturbance regimes. Effects can be far-reaching as they cascade up to higher trophic levels within an ecosystem (Brooks and others 2004; Mack and D'Antonio 1998).

Citation

Brooks, Matthew L. 2008. Chapter 3: Plant invasions and fire regimes. In: Zouhar, Kristin; Smith, Jane Kapler; Sutherland, Steve; Brooks, Matthew L. Wildland fire in ecosystems: fire and nonnative invasive plants. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 6. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 33-46