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Chapter 3. Planning and design for habitat monitoring

Posted date: November 29, 2013
Publication Year: 
2013
Authors: Vojta, Christina D.; McDonald, Lyman L.; Brewer, C. Kenneth; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Rowland, Mary M; Goldstein, Michael I.
Publication Series: 
Book Chapter
Source: In: Rowland, M.M.; Vojta, C.D.; tech. eds. 2013. A technical guide for monitoring wildlife habitat. Gen. Tech. Rep. WO-89. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 22 p.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

This chapter provides guidance for designing a habitat monitoring program so that it will meet the monitoring objective, will be repeatable, and will adequately represent habitat within the spatial extent of interest. Although a number of excellent resources are available for planning and designing a monitoring program for wildlife populations (e.g., Busch and Trexler 2003, McComb et al. 2010, Thompson et al. 1998, Vesely et al. 2006), little guidance exists for creating a monitoring design for habitat. One could argue that the huge body of literature on vegetation sampling is useful for this purpose, and we acknowledge that the basic principles of planning and design for vegetation sampling are indeed relevant. Most texts on vegetation sampling do not address the multiscalar nature of habitat, however, or the nonvegetative aspects of habitat. Moreover, unique challenges arise related to using existing data and to using remotely sensed data for monitoring habitat. Our objective is to emphasize the basic principles of planning and design and to place them in the context of habitat monitoring.

Citation

Vojta , Christina D.; McDonald, Lyman L.; Brewer , C. Kenneth; McKelvey , Kevin S.; Rowland , Mary M; Goldstein, Michael I. 2013. Chapter 3. Planning and design for habitat monitoring. In: Rowland, M.M.; Vojta, C.D., tech. eds. 2013. A technical guide for monitoring wildlife habitat. Gen. Tech. Rep. WO-89. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 22 p.