You are here

Chapter 23. Shrubs of other families

Posted date: February 13, 2009
Publication Year: 
2004
Authors: Monsen, Stephen B.; Stevens, Richard; Shaw, Nancy L.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Monsen, Stephen B.; Stevens, Richard; Shaw, Nancy L., comps. Restoring western ranges and wildlands, vol. 2. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-136-vol-2. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 597-698
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Numerous genera and species of shrubs occur throughout the Intermountain region in addition to those included in the Asteraceae, Chenopodiaceae, and Rosaceae families. Although shrubs are widespread throughout this region and dominate many areas, species richness is low compared to the shrub flora of the Pacific United States, Chile, western Australia, and South Africa (Stebbins 1975). Generally, evolution proceeds most rapidly when populations are isolated from one another and exposed to different environmental conditions (Dobzhansky 1970; Stebbins 1950); this is the case in the Intermountain region. However, fewer numbers of species within this region are, in part, due to the relatively recent advance and retreat of continental seas, drastic environmental changes, and instability that result in a high rate of extinction (Stebbins 1975).

Citation

Monsen, Stephen B.; Stevens, Richard; Shaw, Nancy L. 2004. Chapter 23. Shrubs of other families. In: Monsen, Stephen B.; Stevens, Richard; Shaw, Nancy L., comps. Restoring western ranges and wildlands, vol. 2. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-136-vol-2. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 597-698