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Chapter 22. Rosaceous shrubs

Posted date: February 13, 2009
Publication Year: 
2004
Authors: Shaw, Nancy L.; Monsen, Stephen B.; Stevens, Richard
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Monsen, Stephen B.; Stevens, Richard; Shaw, Nancy L., comps. Restoring western ranges and wildlands, vol. 2. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-136-vol-2. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 539-596
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Important shrubs of the Rose Family (Rosaceae) in the Intermountain region are distributed from blackbrush and salt desert shrub communities through high elevation forests and meadows. Growth habits of this group vary from trailing brambles to upright shrubs and small trees. Some species are evergreen while others are deciduous. Many of these species are highly valued for the cover, fruits, and forage they provide for wildlife and livestock. Rosaceous species that develop spreading root systems, root suckers, rhizomes, or stem layers provide soil stabilization. Several species are capable of regenerating following fire. Those that produce fragrant flowers or colorful fall foliage are prized for their ornamental value.

Citation

Shaw, Nancy L.; Monsen, Stephen B.; Stevens, Richard 2004. Chapter 22. Rosaceous shrubs. In: Monsen, Stephen B.; Stevens, Richard; Shaw, Nancy L., comps. Restoring western ranges and wildlands, vol. 2. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-136-vol-2. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 539-596