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Chapter 18. Grasses

Posted date: February 13, 2009
Publication Year: 
2004
Authors: Monsen, Stephen B.; Stevens, Richard; Shaw, Nancy L.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Monsen, Stephen B.; Stevens, Richard; Shaw, Nancy L., comps. Restoring western ranges and wildlands, vol. 2. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-136-vol-2. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 295-424
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Grasses are adapted to a wide range of edaphic and climatic conditions and are found in nearly all plant communities. In the Western United States, grasses are seeded on disturbances to provide forage (Hull and Holmgren 1964; Vallentine 1989), wildlife habitat (Plummer and others 1968), and watershed stability (Cornelius 1946; Hafenrichter and others 1949; Piper 1934; Stewart and Young 1939). A number of introduced grass species proved well-suited to Western rangelands and received extensive use in early reseeding efforts (Barnes and others 1995; Hafenrichter and others 1968; Moser and others 1996). Use of these and other introductions continued over time, but by the late 1900s, greater emphasis was being placed on the use of native grasses (Roundy and others 1997).

Citation

Monsen, Stephen B.; Stevens, Richard; Shaw, Nancy 2004. Chapter 18. Grasses. In: Monsen, Stephen B.; Stevens, Richard; Shaw, Nancy L., comps. Restoring western ranges and wildlands, vol. 2. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-136-vol-2. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 295-424