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Carbon benefits from fuel treatments

Posted date: February 09, 2011
Publication Year: 
2010
Authors: Cathcart, Jim; Ager, Alan A.; McMahan, Andrew; Finney, Mark A.; Watt, Brian
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Jain, Theresa B.; Graham, Russell T.; Sandquist, Jonathan. Integrated management of carbon sequestration and biomass utilization opportunities in a changing climate: Proceedings of the 2009 National Silviculture Workshop; 2009 June 15-18; Boise, ID. Proceedings RMRS-P-61. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 61-79.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Landscape simulation modeling is used to examine whether fuel treatments result in a carbon offset from avoided wildfire emissions. The study landscape was a 169,200-acre watershed located in south-central Oregon. Burn probability modeling was employed under extreme weather and fuel moisture conditions. Expected carbon stocks post-treatment, post-wildfire were calculated for all stands on the treated landscape; post-wildfire on the untreated landscape. Results show a negative carbon offset initially—the known reduction of carbon stocks from treatment is greater than expected carbon benefit from reduced wildfire emissions. Treatment may break even as a carbon offset after 9 years.

Citation

Cathcart, Jim; Ager, Alan A.; McMahan, Andrew; Finney, Mark; Watt, Brian. 2010. Carbon benefits from fuel treatments. In: Jain, Theresa B.; Graham, Russell T.; Sandquist, Jonathan. Integrated management of carbon sequestration and biomass utilization opportunities in a changing climate: Proceedings of the 2009 National Silviculture Workshop; 2009 June 15-18; Boise, ID. Proceedings RMRS-P-61. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 61-79.