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Can microscale meteorological conditions predict the impact of white pine blister rust in Colorado and Wyoming?

Posted date: July 01, 2011
Publication Year: 
2011
Authors: Jacobi, William R.; Goodrich, Betsy A.; Kearns, Holly S. J.; Burns, Kelly S.; Geils, Brian W.
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 242.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

White pine blister rust occurs when there are compatible interactions between susceptible hosts (white pines and Ribes spp.), inoculum (Cronartium ribicola spores), and local weather conditions during infection. The five spore stages of the white pine blister rust (WPBR) fungus have specific temperature and moisture conditions necessary for production, germination, and dissemination of spores. Local meteorological conditions may be important factors in infection success, infection periodicity and disease intensification over time.

Citation

Jacobi, William R.; Goodrich, Betsy A.; Kearns, Holly S. J.; Burns, Kelly S.; Geils, Brian W. 2011. Can microscale meteorological conditions predict the impact of white pine blister rust in Colorado and Wyoming? In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 242.