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Can metaphysical values protect mountain wildlands from development damage?

Posted date: October 06, 2015
Publication Year: 
2015
Authors: Hamilton, Lawrence S.; Benally, Jeneda
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Watson, Alan; Carver, Stephen; Krenova, Zdenka; McBride, Brooke, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Tenth World Wilderness Congress symposium; 2013, 4-10 October, Salamanca, Spain. Proceedings RMRS-P-74. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 202-208.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

This paper addresses the question of whether spiritual, religious or cultural values held by humans for some wild mountain areas can protect these special places from developments that impair both these values and wild nature. The answer is sometimes yes, sometimes no, and sometimes a minimization of damage. Examples of each of these scenarios are briefly given, along with a more detailed current battle between the sacred and the profane in the case of the San Francisco Peaks in Arizona, USA. Some recommendations are given that help to strengthen the case when intangible values of reverence, cultural tradition, worship and iconic significance come up against destruction or impairment of nature in mountains.

Citation

Hamilton, Lawrence S.; Benally, Jeneda. 2015. Can metaphysical values protect mountain wildlands from development damage? In: Watson, Alan; Carver, Stephen; Krenova, Zdenka; McBride, Brooke, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Tenth World Wilderness Congress symposium; 2013, 4-10 October, Salamanca, Spain. Proceedings RMRS-P-74. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 202-208.