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Burned area emergency watershed rehabilitation: Program goals, techniques, effectiveness, and future directions in the 21st Century

Posted date: October 05, 2012
Publication Year: 
2000
Authors: Neary, Daniel G.Robichaud, Pete R.; Beyers, Jan L.
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Ffolliott, Peter F.; Baker Jr., Malchus B.; Edminster, Carleton B.; Dillon, Madelyn C.; Mora, Karen L., tech. coords. Land Stewardship in the 21st Century: The Contributions of Watershed Management; 2000 March 13-16; Tucson, AZ. Proc. RMRS-P-13. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 375-378.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Following wildfires, burned areas are assessed by special teams to determine if emergency watershed rehabilitation measures are required to restore watershed function and minimize damage to soil resources. The objective of burned area emergency rehabilitation (BAER) treatments is to restore watershed condition and reduce erosional losses on hillslopes, in channels, and on road surfaces and peripheral areas such as ditches. In the Western United States, a project is currently in progress to determine the costs and effectiveness of BAER projects in restoring watershed function. Results of this project will help establish the future directions of the BAER program into the 21st century.

Citation

Neary, Daniel G.; Robichaud, Peter R.; Beyers, Jan L. 2000. Burned area emergency watershed rehabilitation: Program goals, techniques, effectiveness, and future directions in the 21st Century. In: Ffolliott, Peter F.; Baker Jr., Malchus B.; Edminster, Carleton B.; Dillon, Madelyn C.; Mora, Karen L., tech. coords. Land Stewardship in the 21st Century: The Contributions of Watershed Management; 2000 March 13-16; Tucson, AZ. Proc. RMRS-P-13. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 375-378.