You are here

Biological responses to stressors in aquatic ecosystems in western North America: Cumulative watershed effects of fuel treatments, wildfire, and post-fire remediation

Posted date: January 12, 2010
Publication Year: 
2010
Authors: McCormick, Frank H.; Riemen, Bruce E.; Kershner, Jeffrey L.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Elliot, William J.; Miller, Ina Sue; Audin, Lisa, eds. Cumulative watershed effects of fuel management in the western United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-231. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 206-233.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Aquatic communities in North America evolved with disturbance regimes (for example, glaciation, erosion, tectonics, volcanism, fire) that varied in frequency, intensity, and severity (Poff 1992; Power and others 1988; Resh and others 1988). Disturbance has been recognized for its importance in the organization and maintenance of aquatic ecosystems (Reeves and others 1995), in shaping species resilience and persistence (Reice and others 1990; Yount and Niemi 1990), and structuring the evolution of aquatic organisms (Lake 2000; Malanson 1984; Schlosser 1990; Sedell and others 1990). Disturbances are regarded as having a dominant role in determining the structure of stream communities (Palmer and others 1996; Resh and others 1988).

Citation

McCormick, Frank H.; Riemen, Bruce E.; Kershner, Jeffrey L. 2010. Biological responses to stressors in aquatic ecosystems in western North America: Cumulative watershed effects of fuel treatments, wildfire, and post-fire remediation. In: Elliot, William J.; Miller, Ina Sue; Audin, Lisa, eds. Cumulative watershed effects of fuel management in the western United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-231. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 206-233.