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Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) communities: Ecology, importance and restoration potential

Posted date: May 04, 2006
Publication Year: 
2000
Authors: Monsen, Stephen B.; Shaw, Nancy L.
Publication Series: 
Miscellaneous Publication
Source: Billings Land Reclamation Symposium, 2000 : striving for restoration, fostering technology and policy for reestablishing ecological function : March 20-24, 2000, Sheraton Billings Hotel, Billings, Montana. Bozeman : Montana State University, 2000. Publication no. 00-01

Abstract

Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) is the most common and widespread sagebrush species in the Intermountain region. Climatic patterns, elevation gradients, soil characteristics and fire are among the factors regulating the distribution of its three major subspecies. Each of these subspecies is considered a topographic climax dominant. Reproductive strategies of big sagebrush subspecies have evolved that favor the development of both regional and localized populations.

Citation

Monsen, Stephen B.; Shaw, Nancy L. 2000. Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) communities: Ecology, importance and restoration potential. Billings Land Reclamation Symposium, 2000 : striving for restoration, fostering technology and policy for reestablishing ecological function : March 20-24, 2000, Sheraton Billings Hotel, Billings, Montana. Bozeman : Montana State University, 2000. Publication no. 00-01