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Basin wildrye (Leymus cinereus) pooled tetraploid accessions for U.S. Intermountain rangeland reclamation

Posted date: October 03, 2014
Publication Year: 
2013
Authors: Young, Stanford A.; Vernon, Jason; Shaw, Nancy L.
Publication Series: 
Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
Source: In: Michalk, D. L.; Millar, G. D.; Badgery, W. B.; Broadfoot, K. M., eds. Revitalising Grasslands to Sustain our Communities: Proceedings 22nd International Grassland Congress; 2013 September 15-19. Orange New South Wales, Australia: New South Wales Department of Primary Industry. p. 381-382.

Abstract

Basin wildrye (Leymus cinereus [Scribn. & Merr.] A. Love) is an important perennial, hardy, long-lived, cool season C3 native grass of rangeland plant communities throughout much of western United States and Canada. All classes of livestock and wildlife, including large and small birds and mammals, utilise the grass year round for food and protection due to its 2-3 m tall, stiff stature which pro-vides standing winter cover. Though occurring in precipitation areas of 150-500 mm and elevations of 600 to 3,000 m, it is usually found in deep, well-drained soils of high water holding capacity along drainage areas. Seedling vigour is only fair, and stands may take 2 to 5 years to fully establish. While tolerant of low to moderate levels (

Citation

Young, Stanford A.; Vernon, Jason; Shaw, Nancy. 2013. Basin wildrye (Leymus cinereus) pooled tetraploid accessions for U.S. Intermountain rangeland reclamation. In: Michalk, D. L.; Millar, G. D.; Badgery, W. B.; Broadfoot, K. M., eds. Revitalising Grasslands to Sustain our Communities: Proceedings 22nd International Grassland Congress; 2013 September 15-19. Orange New South Wales, Australia: New South Wales Department of Primary Industry. p. 381-382.