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Annual observations of conspicuous canker activity on whitebark pine (2003 to 2007)

Posted date: July 01, 2011
Publication Year: 
2011
Authors: Murray, Michael P.
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 235-237.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Whitebark pine's (Pinus albicaulis) notable ecological values, combined with its precarious state, underscore the need for monitoring its health and dynamics. Populations of whitebark pine are in decline throughout most of its range. White pine blister rust, caused by the fungus Cronartium ribicola, has denuded stands since introduction during the early 1900s (Tomback and Achuff 2010). The exclusion of fire, which historically promoted whitebark pine over its competitors, has further lessened its proportional abundance with competitors (Murray 2007; Murray and others 2000). Mountain pine beetle epidemics have killed vast acreages since 2003 (Haeussler 2008; Kegley and others, these proceedings; Logan and others 2010). Due to one or more of these threats, whitebark pine has declined in areal cover up to 98 percent in places (Schwandt 2006).

Citation

Murray, Michael P. 2011. Annual observations of conspicuous canker activity on whitebark pine (2003 to 2007). In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 235-237.