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Deforestation in Haiti is well documented, with an estimated original forest cover remaining of approximately 1%. This widespread deforestation is primarily a result of hundreds of years of spreading subsistence agriculture and cutting for cooking fuel. Most of the remnant stands of original forest cover in Haiti are highly fragmented, with the last remnants primarily found in Massif de la Hotte mountain range of the southwest. This area has...
A historically consistent and broadly applicable monitoring, reporting, and verification system based on lidar sampling and Landsat time-series (tested in the US, and applied to the US NGHGI reporting system).
North American Forest Dynamics (NAFD) project is exploiting the Landsat historical record to develop a quantitative understanding of forest disturbance patterns across the conterminous US.
The Landscape Change Monitoring System (LCMS) is an emerging remote sensing-based system for mapping and monitoring land cover and land use change across the US. Envisioned as a framework for integrating Landsat-based products and other datasets, LCMS  is producing spatially, temporally, and thematically comprehensive data and information from which landscape change can be consistently assessed, documented, and analyzed at the national scale. 
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is an ecologically important species in high-altitude areas of the West due to the habitat and food source it provides for Clark’s nutcrackers, red squirrels, grizzly bears, and other animals. Whitebark pine stands have recently experienced high mortality due to wildfire, white pine blister rust, and a mountain pine beetle outbreak, leading to questions about the species’ long-term viability. This project seeks...
We will deliver a spatially explicit predictive tool depicting resilience to disturbance and resistance to cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) invasion across the Great Basin.
Efforts to deploy genetically appropriate plant materials build on the concept of local adaptation, that is, the intent to match adaptive genetic characteristics to variation in ecological clines pertinent to plant establishment and persistence. Here, basin wildrye (Leymus cinereus (Scribn. & Merr.) Á. Löve) sources from 25 wild populations are planted at four test sites representing the species distribution across generalized provisional...
This study evaluated the effects of species, sowing depth and dormancy status, and the treatment effect of row cover on field emergence of 20 forbs native to the Great Basin. Implemented at three sites in 2013 and 2014, forb seeds were sown at four planting depths within the expected variation of the Kemmerer Rangeland or Truax Rough Rider drills.

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