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William J. Elliot

Bill Elliot - Research Engineer

Research Civil Engineer

Address: 
1221 South Main Street
Moscow, ID 83843
Phone: 
208-883-2338
Fax: 
208-883-2318
Contact William J. Elliot

Current Research

Forest and Rangeland Watershed Processes, Soil erosion processes and prediction, Applications of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model to forests and rangelands, Impacts of forest management activities on runoff, erosion and sediment delivery; Improving the Interagency Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) Model to better predict forest hydrologic processes; Develop predictive tools to support research in and management of forest and rangeland watersheds. Linking Fire Spread and Erosion Models.

For more information, please see:

Elliot, William J.; Miller, Mary Ellen; Enstice, Nic. 2016. Targeting forest management through fire and erosion modeling. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 25: 876-887.

Miller, M. E.; Elliot, W. J.; Billmire, M.; Robichaud, P. R.; Endsley, K. A. 2016. Rapid-response tools and datasets for post-fire remediation: Linking remote sensing and process-based hydrological models. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 25: 1061-1073.

Robichaud, Peter R.; Elliot, William J.; Lewis, Sarah A.; Miller, Mary Ellen. 2016. Validation of a probabilistic post-fire erosion model. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 25(3): 337-350.

Srivastava, A.; Dobre, M.; Wu, J. Q.; Elliot, W. J.; Bruner, E. A.; Dun, S.; Brooks, E. S.; Miller, I. S. 2013. Modifying WEPP to improve streamflow simulation in a Pacific Northwest watershed. Transactions of the ASABE. 56(2): 603-611.

Elliot, W. J. 2013. Erosion processes and prediction with WEPP technology in forests in the Northwestern U.S. Transactions of the ASABE. 56(2): 563-579.

Elliot, William J. 2010. Effects of forest biomass use on watershed processes in the western United States. Western Journal of Applied Forestry. 25(1)12-17.

Elliot, William J.; Miller, Ina Sue; Audin, Lisa. Eds. 2010. Cumulative watershed effects of fuel management in the western United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-231. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 299 p.

Research Interests

Making complex watershed tools useful to watershed managers.

Past Research

Vegetable and crop storage, soil erodibility properties.

Why This Research is Important

Water is essential for human livelihood, industrial productivity aquatic ecosystems and plant growth. The greatest pollutant of surface water is sediment. As we better understand watershed processes and sources and fates of sediment, we will better be able to provide abundant clean water for people in the U.S. and throughout the world.

Education

  • Iowa State University, B.S., Agricultural Engineering, 1971
  • University of Aberdeen, Scotland, M.S., Agricultural Engineering, 1980
  • Iowa State University, Ph.D., Agricultural Engineering, 1988
  • Professional Experience

    Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
    1989 to 1991

    Lecture and teach labs in soil and water management and engineering to agriculture, natural resource, and agricultural engineering students. Research in soil erodibility prediction
    Senior Lecturer, Writtle Agriculture College, Chelmsford, Essex, UK
    1982 to 1985

    Lecture and teach labs in machinery use and maintenance to agriculture and horticulture students, and to agricultural engineers
    Agricultural Engineer, Rural Development Institute, Gbarnga, Liberia
    1981 to 1982

    Recruited by Near East Foundation, New York City, to: Lecture and teach labs in farm building design and construction, and machinery use to 2-yr agriculture students.
    Mechanisation Advisor, North of Scotland College of Agriculture, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK
    1976 to 1980

    Assist farmers with crop storage, machinery selection, and land drainage.
    Resident Engineer, Bahamas Agric. Devel. Project, Pennsylvania State University
    1974 to 1975

    On a USAID Project on Andros Island, Bahamas Develop and oversee machinery, vehicle and building maintenance programs Initiate research in land development and groundwater hydrology
    U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer, Embu Institute of Agriculture, Embu, Kenya
    1971 to 1973

    Lecture and teach labs in farm building design and construction, and machinery use and maintenance

    Professional Organizations

    • State of Ohio, Registered Professional Engineer ( 1989 to present )
    • Soil and Water Conservation Society, Leader ( 1988 to present )
    • American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Fellow ( 1973 to present )
      Soil Erosion Research, Forest Engineering, Assist in planning technical sessions and specialty conferences

    Featured Publications

    Publications

    Nunes, Joao P.; Doerr, Stefan H.; Sheridan, Gary; Neris, Jonay; Santin, Cristina; Emelko, Monica B.; Silins, Uldis; Robichaud, Pete R.; Elliot, William J.; Keizer, Jacob, 2018. Assessing water contamination risk from vegetation fires: Challenges, opportunities and a framework for progress
    Srivastava, A.; Wu, J. Q.; Elliot, William J.; Brooks, E. S.; Flanagan, D. C., 2017. Modeling streamflow in a snow-dominated forest watershed using the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model
    Han, Sang-Kyun; Han, Han-Sup; Elliot, William J.; Bilek, Edward M., 2017. ThinTool: a spreadsheet model to evaluate fuel reduction thinning cost, net energy output, and nutrient impacts
    Liu, X.; Wu, J. Q.; Conrad, P. W.; Dun, S.; Todd, C. S.; McNearny, R. L.; Elliot, William J.; Rhee, H.; Clark, P., 2016. Impact of surface coal mining on soil hydraulic properties
    Elliot, William J.; Miller, Mary Ellen; Enstice, Nic, 2015. Combining fire and erosion modeling to target forest management activities
    Elliot, William J.; Brooks, Erin; Traeumer, Drea Em; Dobre, Mariana, 2015. Extending WEPP technology to predict fine sediment and phosphorus delivery from forested hillslopes
    Sanchez-Murillo, Ricardo; Brooks, Erin S.; Elliot, William J.; Boll, Jan, 2015. Isotope hydrology and baseflow geochemistry in natural and human-altered watersheds in the Inland Pacific Northwest, USA
    Klein, Linda R.; Hendrix, William G.; Lohr, Virginia I.; Kaytes, Jolie B.; Sayler, Rodney D.; Swanson, Mark E.; Elliot, William J.; Reganold, John P., 2015. Linking ecology and aesthetics in sustainable agricultural landscapes: Lessons from the Palouse region of Washington, U.S.A
    Dobre, Mariana; Wu, Joan Q.; Elliot, William J.; Miller, Ina Sue S.; Jain, Terrie B., 2014. Effects of topographic features on postfire exposed mineral soil in small watersheds
    Wang, Li; Wu, Joan Q.; Elliot, William J.; Feidler, Fritz R.; Lapin, Sergey., 2014. Linear diffusion-wave channel routing using a discrete Hayami convolution method
    Elliot, William J.; Edwards, P. J.; Foltz, R. B., 2014. Research related to roads in USDA experimental forests [Chapter 16]
    Miller, Sue; Essen, Maureen; Anderson, Nathaniel (Nate); Chung, Woody; Elliot, William J.; Page-Dumroese, Deborah S.; Han, Han-Sup; Hogland, John; Keyes, Christopher R., 2014. Science You Can Use Bulletin: Burgeoning biomass: Creating efficient and sustainable forest biomass supply chains in the Rockies
    Miller, Sue; Elliot, William J.; Robichaud, Pete R.; Foltz, Randy; Flanagan, Dennis; Brooks, Erin, 2014. Science You Can Use Bulletin: From watersheds to the web: Online tools for modeling forest soil erosion
    Dun, S.; Wu, J. Q.; Elliot, William J.; Frankenberger, J. R.; Flanagan, D. C.; McCool, D. K., 2013. Applying online WEPP to assess forest watershed hydrology
    Flanagan, D. C.; Frankenberger, J. R.; Cochrane, T. A.; Renschler, C. S.; Elliot, William J., 2013. Geospatial application of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model
    Srivastava, A.; Dobre, M.; Wu, J. Q.; Elliot, William J.; Bruner, E. A.; Dun, S.; Brooks, E. S.; Miller, Ina Sue S., 2013. Modifying WEPP to improve streamflow simulation in a Pacific Northwest watershed
    McCool, D. K.; Dun, S.; Wu, J. Q.; Elliot, William J.; Brooks, E. S., 2013. Seasonal change of WEPP erodibility parameters for two fallow plots on a palouse silt loam
    Dobre, Mariana; Elliot, William J.; Wu, Joan Q.; Link, Timothy E.; Glaza, Brandon; Jain, Terrie B.; Hudak, Andrew T., 2012. Relationship of field and LiDAR estimates of forest canopy cover with snow accumulation and melt
    Srivastava, A.; Dobre, M.; Bruner, E.; Elliot, William J.; Miller, I. S.; Wu, J. Q., 2011. Application of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) Model to simulate streamflow in a PNW forest watershed
    Wu, J. Q.; Dun, S.; Rhee, H.; Liu, X.; Elliot, William J.; Golnar, T.; Frankenberger, J. R.; Flanagan, D. C.; Conrad, P. W.; McNearny, R. L., 2011. Applying WEPP technologies to western alkaline surface coal mines
    Dun, S.; Wu, J. Q.; Elliot, William J.; Frankenberger, J. R.; Flanagan, D. C.; McCool, D. K., 2011. Applying online WEPP to assess forest watershed hydrology
    Frankenberger, J. R.; Dun, S.; Flanagan, D. C.; Wu, J. Q.; Elliot, William J., 2011. Development of a GIS interface for WEPP Model application to Great Lakes forested watersheds
    Moreira, Eder Paulo; Elliot, William J.; Hudak, Andrew T., 2011. Effects of DTM resolution on slope steepness and soil loss prediction on hillslope profiles
    Dobre, Mariana; Elliot, William J.; Wu, Joan Q.; Link, Timothy E.; Miller, Ina Sue S., 2011. Effects of forest cover and environmental variables on snow accumulation and melt
    Elliot, William J.; Robichaud, Pete R.; Foltz, R. B., 2011. Erosion processes and prediction in NW U.S. forests
    Flanagan, D. C.; Frankenberger, J. R.; Cochrane, T. A.; Renschler, C. S.; Elliot, William J., 2011. Geospatial application of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) Model
    Grace, J. McFero III; Elliot, William J., 2011. Influence of forest roads and BMPs on soil erosion
    Miller, Mary Ellen; MacDonald, Lee H.; Robichaud, Pete R.; Elliot, William J., 2011. Predicting post-fire hillslope erosion in forest lands of the western United States
    Robichaud, Pete R.; Elliot, William J.; Wagenbrenner, J. W., 2011. Probabilistic soil erosion modeling using the Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMIT) after wildfires
    McCool, D. K.; Dun, S.; Wu, J. Q.; Elliot, William J., 2011. Seasonal change of WEPP erodibility parameters on a fallow plot
    Wang, Li; Wu, Joan Q.; Elliot, William J.; Dun, Shuhui; Lapin, Sergey; Fiedler, Fritz R.; Flanagan, Dennis C., 2010. Implementation of channel-routing routines in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model
    Bayley, Timothy; Elliot, William J.; Nearing, Mark A.; Guertin, D. Phillp; Johnson, Thomas; Goodrich, David; Flanagan, Dennis, 2010. Modeling erosion under future climates with the WEPP model
    Wagenbrenner, J. W.; Robichaud, Pete R.; Elliot, William J., 2010. Rill erosion in natural and disturbed forests: 2. Modeling approaches
    Flanagan, D. C.; Elliot, William J.; Frankenberger, J. R.; Huang, C., 2010. WEPP Model applications for evaluations of best management practices
    Robichaud, Pete R.; Elliot, William J.; Pierson, F. B.; Hall, D. E.; Moffet, C. A., 2009. A probabilistic approach to modeling postfire erosion after the 2009 Australian bushfires
    Dun, Shuhui; Wu, Joan Q.; Elliot, William J.; Robichaud, Pete R.; Flanagan, Dennis C.; Frankenberger, James R.; Brown, Robert E.; Xu, Arthur C., 2009. Adapting the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model for forest applications
    Elliot, William J.; Glaza, Brandon D., 2009. Impacts of forest management on runoff and erosion
    Elliot, William J.; Foltz, R. B.; Robichaud, Pete R., 2009. Recent findings related to measuring and modeling forest road erosion
    Foltz, Randy B.; Rhee, Hakjun; Elliot, William J., 2008. Modeling changes in rill erodibility and critical shear stress on native surface roads
    Pan, Fei; Han, Han-Sup; Johnson, Leonard R.; Elliot, William J., 2008. Net energy output from harvesting small-diameter trees using a mechanized system
    Pan, Fei; Han, Han-Sup; Johnson, Leonard R.; Elliot, William J., 2008. Production and cost of harvesting, processing, and transporting small-diameter (< 5 inches) trees for energy
    Elliot, William J.; Hyde, Kevin; MacDonald, Lee; McKean, James., 2007. Chapter 13: Tools for analysis
    Robichaud, Peter R.; Elliot, William J.; Pierson, Fredrick B.; Hall, David E.; Moffet, Corey A.; Ashmun, Louise E., 2007. Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) user manual (version 2006.01.18)
    Elliot, William J.; Robichaud, Pete R.; Miller, Ina Sue S., 2007. Erosion rates from forests and rangelands following fuel management
    Elliot, William J.; Miller, Ina Sue S.; Hall, David, 2007. WEPP FuME Analysis for a North Idaho Site
    Robichaud, Peter R.; Elliot, William J., 2006. Protection from erosion following wildfire
    Elliot, William J.; Miller, Ina Sue S.; Glaza, Brandon D., 2006. Using WEPP technology to predict erosion and runoff following wildfire
    USDA Forest Service,; Rummer, Bob; Prestemon, Jeff; May, Dennis; Miles, Pat; Vissage, John; McRoberts, Ron; Liknes, Greg; Shepperd, Wayne D.; Ferguson, Dennis; Elliot, William J.; Miller, Ina Sue S.; Reutebuch, Steve; Barbour, Jamie; Fried, Jeremy; Stokes, Bryce; Bilek, Edward; Skog, Ken, 2005. A strategic assessment of forest biomass and fuel reduction treatments in Western States
    Lewis, Sarah A.; Robichaud, Peter R.; Elliot, William J.; Frazier, Bruce E.; Wu, Joan Q., 2004. Hyperspectral remote sensing of postfire soil properties
    Elliot, William J.; Miller, Ina Sue S., 2004. Measuring low rates of erosion from forest fuel reduction operations
    Rummer, Bob; Prestemon, Jeff; May, Dennis; Miles, Pat; Vissage, John; McRoberts, Ron; Liknes, Greg; Shepperd, Wayne D.; Ferguson, Dennis; Elliot, William J.; Miller, Ina Sue S.; Reutebuch, Steve; Barbour, Jamie; Fried, Jeremy; Stokes, Bryce; Bilek, Edward; Skog, Ken, 2003. A strategic assessment of forest biomass and fuel reduction treatments in western states
    Elliot, William J.; Ballerini, Mark; Hall, David, 2003. Simplified methods for evaluating road prism stability
    Elliot, William J.; Foltz, Randy B., 2003. The challenges in developing the WEPP cumulative effects model
    Elliot, William J.; Robichaud, Peter R.; Pannkuk, C. D., 2001. A probabilistic approach to modeling erosion for spatially-varied conditions
    Elliot, William J.; Robichaud, Peter R., 2001. Comparing erosion risks from forest operations to wildfire
    Page-Dumroese, Deborah S.; Jurgensen, Martin; Elliot, William J.; Rice, Thomas; Nesser, John; Collins, Thomas; Meurisse, Robert., 2000. Soil quality standards and guidelines for forest sustainability in northwestern North America
    Elliot, William J.; Hall, David E.; Graves, S. R., 1998. X-DRAIN and XDS: a simplified road erosion prediction method
    Elliot, William J.; Foltz, R. B.; Luce, Charles H., 1995. Validation of Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model for low-volume forest roads
    straw bales spread on the most erodible parts after the 2015 Butte Fire
    The Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS), in collaboration with Michigan Technological Research Institute (MTRI), received a grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to develop an online database that would quickly combine the information provided by satellite images that showed the distribution of fire severity with USGS and NRCS databases and deliver that information in a format that was readily accessible by the Water Erosion Prediction Project Geospatial Interface (GeoWEPP).
    Lake Tahoe is renowned for its intense blue hue (photo compliments of Wikimedia Commons).
    Forest Service scientists developed the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model for forest conditions. Recent improvements to this model are the addition of shallow lateral flow as one of the primary sources of runoff from steep forested watersheds and the development of a phosphorus delivery model.
    A workshop was hosted by the Coalition for the Poudre River Watershed for those interested in wildfires and post-fire ecology and impacts, discussing transmission of key research findings from work done in the High Park Fire on key topics, implications for post fire restoration management decision making and identification of barriers to rehab/restoration action & knowledge gaps. Researchers from Rocky Mountain Research Station, CSU, and other regional institutions presented results from their work since the High Park Fire.
    Forest biomass is a promising feedstock (raw material to supply or fuel a machine or industrial process) for the production of bioenergy, biofuels, and bioproducts because it is renewable and widely available as a byproduct of forest management. However, there are many obstacles have that have prevented more widespread use of forest biomass. This project was set in place to quantify and evaluate these obstacles so that land managers can overcome them.
    The Air, Water and Aquatic Environments Science Program has developed a suite of internet interfaces, the Forest Service Water Erosion Prediction Project (FS WEPP), designed to allow users to quickly evaluate erosion and sediment delivery potential from forest roads.