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Thomas Franklin

T.Franklin

eDNA Program Coordinator

Address: 
800 East Beckwith Avenue
Missoula, MT 59801-5801
Phone: 
406-542-4171
Contact Thomas Franklin

Education

  • Appalachian State University, M.S., Ecology & Evolution, 2016
  • Appalachian State University, B.S. Biology, Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Science, 2014
  • Publications

    Franklin, Thomas; Wilcox, Taylor M.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Greaves, Samuel; Dysthe, Joseph; Young, Michael K.; Schwartz, Michael K., 2019. Repurposing environmental DNA samples to verify the distribution of Rocky Mountain tailed frogs in the Warm Springs Creek Basin, Montana
    Franklin, Thomas; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Golding, Jessie; Mason, Daniel H.; Dysthe, Joseph; Pilgrim, Kristine L.; Squires, John R.; Aubry, Keith B.; Long, Robert A.; Greaves, Samuel; Raley, Catherine M.; Jackson, Scott; MacKay, Paula; Lisbon, Joshua; Sauder, Joel D.; Pruss, Michael T.; Heffington, Don; Schwartz, Michael K., 2019. Using environmental DNA methods to improve winter surveys for rare carnivores: DNA from snow and improved noninvasive techniques
    Franklin, Thomas; Dysthe, Joseph; Rubenson, Erika S.; Carim, Kellie; Olden, Julian D.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Young, Michael K.; Schwartz, Michael K., 2018. A non-invasive sampling method for detecting non-native smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu)
    Dysthe, Joseph; Franklin, Thomas; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Young, Michael K.; Schwartz, Michael K., 2018. An improved environmental DNA assay for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) based on the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer I
    Franklin, Thomas; Dysthe, Joseph; Golden, Michael; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Hossack, Blake R.; Carim, Kellie; Tait, Cynthia; Young, Michael K.; Schwartz, Michael K., 2018. Inferring presence of the western toad (Anaxyrus boreas) species complex using environmental DNA
    Dysthe, Joseph; Carim, Kellie; Franklin, Thomas; Kikkert, Dave; Young, Michael K.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Schwartz, Michael K., 2018. Molecular detection of northern leatherside chub (Lepidomeda copei) DNA in environmental samples
    Dysthe, Joseph; Rodgers, Torrey; Franklin, Thomas; Carim, Kellie; Young, Michael K.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Mock, Karen E.; Schwartz, Michael K., 2018. Repurposing environmental DNA samples: Detecting the western pearlshell (Margaritifera falcata) as a proof of concept
    Wilcox, T. M.; Carim, Kellie; Young, Michael K.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Franklin, Thomas; Schwartz, Michael K., 2018. The importance of sound methodology in environmental DNA sampling
    Mason, Daniel H.; Dysthe, Joseph; Franklin, Thomas; Skorupski, Joseph A.; Young, Michael K.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Schwartz, Michael K., 2018. qPCR detection of Sturgeon chub (Macrhybopsis gelida) DNA in environmental samples
    Effective conservation and management decisions for habitats require information about the distribution of multiple species but such data is expensive to obtain; this often limits data collection to just a few, high-profile species. Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling can be more sensitive, and less expensive, than traditional sampling for aquatic species, and a single sample potentially contains DNA from all species present in a waterbody. Cost-savings accrue if eDNA collected for detecting a particular species can be repurposed to detect additional species. This study tested the feasibility of repurposing and re-analyzing already collected samples.   
    The website provides: 1) A large list of supporting science behind eDNA sampling. 2) The recommended field protocol for eDNA sampling and the equipment loan program administered by the NGC. 3) A systematically-spaced sampling grid for all flowing waters of the U.S. in a downloadable format that includes unique database identifiers and geographic coordinates for all sampling sites. Available for download in an Geodatabase or available by ArcGIS Online map. This sampling grid can be used to determine your field collection sites to contribute. 4) The lab results of eDNA sampling at those sites where project partners have agreed to share data.

    RMRS Science Program Areas: 
    Wildlife and Terrestrial Ecosystems