You are here

News Releases

Throughout the western United States, whitebark pine is experiencing high mortality, leading to concern about long-term viability of whitebark pine and other species that depend on it. Two new studies of whitebark pine in the western U.S. show that this species continues to die-off in alarming numbers and identifies locations where forest managers may be able to encourage growth of young whitebark pines.
Have you ever touched a hot pepper and then rubbed your eyes? Chances are you will not want to go near the pepper again. A new study found that you can use this same concept to deter rodents from eating seeds, thus protecting investments in native plant restoration efforts.
The number and size of large wildfires have increased dramatically in the western United States during the past three decades. Contrary to previous understanding, new research shows that significant declines in summer precipitation and lengthening dry spells during summer are major drivers of the increase in fire activity.
Twenty-five years ago this summer, in the spirit of cooperation, the Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and U.S.
Imagine that you could look online at interactive maps showing precisely where any species of fish, amphibian, or mussel occurs throughout the U.S. in streams, lakes, and ponds - all in one comprehensive location. The newly-released eDNAtlas is turning this idea into an open-access online reality. 
Over the last decade, decisions surrounding the provenance, or the geographic origin of a seed source, has sparked a debate whether or not to use local native or nonlocal native seed. A new paper turns a traditionally theoretical discussion into specific priority actions for researchers and practitioners involved in restoration.
A new study found that these trees not only repel mountain pine beetles; they also do not support the survival of the beetle’s offspring. This makes the Great Basin bristlecone pine distinct, as nearly all other pine species within mountain pine beetle’s native range in western North America have been shown to be susceptible hosts.
Are the demographics of our country mirrored in public lands use? A new study shows that this is not the case.
The Greater sage-grouse, once estimated to have a population of 16 million across the western United States, is now believed to be less than one million. The population decline is related to their habitat, much of which has been degraded by non-native grasses and fragmented by development. Because of the location-specific nature of their mating ritual, greater sage-grouse are particularly vulnerable to habitat disruption. New research builds the...
What will the future hold for western river systems and the cold-water species that depend on them? To answer this question, scientists at the USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station compiled temperature records from nearly 400 monitoring sites along large rivers in the northwestern United States.

Pages