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Keyword: wolverine

Wolverines in winter: Indirect habitat loss and functional responses to backcountry recreation

Publications Posted on: April 05, 2019
Outdoor recreation is increasingly recognized to impact nature and wildlife, yet few studies have examined recreation within large natural landscapes that are critical habitat to some of our most rare and potentially disturbance-sensitive species. Over six winters (2010-2015) and four study areas (> 1.1 million ha) in Idaho,Wyoming, and Montana, we studied the responses of wolverines (Gulo gulo) to backcountry winter recreation.

Fishers and martens and lynx, oh my! Multiregional, goal efficient monitoring of mesocarnivores

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2019
Mesocarnivores, fisher, marten, lynx, wolverine and others, are an important part of forest ecosystems, but they are often difficult to detect, occur in low densities, and have large home ranges. This makes it difficult for biologists to estimate the number of individuals in a specific species in a particular ecosystem. Publication: RMRS-GTR-388

Multispecies mesocarnivore monitoring: USDA Forest Service multiregional monitoring approach

Publications Posted on: December 14, 2018
Small- to mid-sized forest carnivores, also known as mesocarnivores, are an important part of the animal community within national forests.

Effects of climate change on wildlife in the Northern Rockies [Chapter 8]

Publications Posted on: September 22, 2017
Few data exist on the direct effects of climatic variability and change on animal species. Therefore, projected climate change effects must be inferred from what is known about habitat characteristics and the autecology of each species.

Plants and animals

Pages Posted on: February 06, 2017
National Forest System lands provide valuable habitat for a wide-range of species. These publications and tools provide information regarding individual species and their habitats. The information here should be supplemented by information specific to the individual planning unit.

Study gauges the response of wolverines to winter recreation

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 14, 2016
Forest Service scientists and their research partners use a novel approach that includes trapping and fitting wolverines with GPS collars that accurately plot their movements in areas of high winter recreation. Thenvolunteer snowmobilers, back-country skiers, and other recreationists carry GPS units in the same areas used by wolverines. Resulting data show how wolverines respond to winter recreation in terms of their movements, behaviors, and resource-use.

Designing cost-effective biodiversity corridors

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 26, 2016
A new optimization technique will help conservation biologists choose the most cost-effective ways of connecting isolated populations of rare species. As the human population grows and expands its footprint, maintaining the connectivity of wildlife habitats is a challenge, but an RMRS-led team has developed tools for cost-effective solutions.

The scientific basis for conserving forest carnivores: American marten, fisher, lynx, and wolverine in the western United States.

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This cooperative effort by USDA Forest Service Research and the National Forest System assesses the state of knowledge related to the conservation status of four forest carnivores in the western United States: American marten, fisher, lynx, and wolverine. The conservation assessment reviews the biology and ecology of these species. It also discusses management considerations stemming from what is known and identifies information needed.

Chapter 6: The scientific basis for conserving forest carnivores: considerations for management

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
The reviews presented in previous chapters reveal substantial gaps in our knowledge about marten, fisher, lynx, and wolverine. These gaps severely constrain our ability to design reliable conservation strategies. This problem will be explored in depth in Chapter 7. In this chapter, our objective is to discuss management considerations resulting from what we currently know (and don't know) about these four forest carnivores.

Chapter 7: Information needs and a research strategy for conserving forest carnivores

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This forest carnivore conservation assessment summarizes what is known about the biology and ecology of the American marten, fisher, lynx, and wolverine. It is the first step in ascertaining what information we need to develop a scientifically sound strategy for species conservation.

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