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Keyword: wildland fire

Effects of drought on wildfires in forest landscapes of the Western Ghats, India

Publications Posted on: August 06, 2019
Wildland fire is an understudied yet highly important disturbance agent on the Indian subcontinent. In particular, there is uncertainty regarding the degree to which annual climate variation influences inter-annual variability in fire activity. In this study, we evaluate wildland fire at two complementary spatial scales in the southern portion of the Western Ghats mountain range (hereafter ‘Western Ghats’) in India.

Living on the edge: Trailing edge forests at risk of fire-facilitated conversion to non-forest

Publications Posted on: March 21, 2019
Forests are an incredibly important resource across the globe, yet they are threatened by climate change through stressors such as drought, insect outbreaks, and wildfire. Trailing edge forests - those areas expected to experience range contractions under a changing climate - are of particular concern because of the potential for abrupt conversion to non-forest.

Managing wildfire for whitebark pine ecosystem restoration in western North America

Publications Posted on: December 14, 2018
Wildfire in declining whitebark pine forests can be a tool for ecosystem restoration or an ecologically harmful event. This document presents a set of possible wildfire management practices for facilitating the restoration of whitebark pine across its range inWestern North America. These management actions are designed to enhance whitebark pine resilience and health, while also being effective wildfire management measures.

An evaluation of NDFD weather forecasts for wildland fire behavior prediction

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2018
Wildland fire managers in the United States currently utilize the gridded forecasts from the National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) to make fire behavior predictions across complex landscapes during large wildfires. However, little is known about the NDFDs performance in remote locations with complex topography for weather variables important for fire behavior prediction, including air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed.

An update of the National Fire Danger Rating System

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 13, 2018
The National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) is a system that allows fire managers to estimate today's or tomorrow's fire danger for a given area. In 2014, RMRS fire danger rating system developers sought and gained approval to update the U.S. National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS).

Smoke management guide for prescribed and wildland fire: 2001 edition.

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
The National Wildfire Coordinating Group's (NWCG) Fire Use Working Team has assumed overall responsibility for sponsoring the development and production of this revised Smoke Management Guide for Prescribed and Wildland Fire (the "Guide").

Integrating urban and national forest inventory data in support of rural-urban assessments

Publications Posted on: July 23, 2018
Due to the interest in status and trends in forest resources, many countries conduct a national forest inventory (NFI). To better understand the characteristics of woody vegetation in areas that are typically not forested, there is an increasing emphasis on urban inventory efforts where all trees both within and outside forest areas are measured.

What drives low-severity fire in the southwestern United States?

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 15, 2018
Dry conifer forests in the Western United States historically had low impact surface fires approximately every five to 30 years. Due to more than 100 years of successful fire exclusion, however, many of these forests are now denser, and therefore have a greater probability of experiencing intense fires that burn entire stands and convert forests to non-forest landscapes. What environmental conditions are necessary to promote low-severity fire in dry conifer forests? Causes and consequences of high-severity fires are increasingly being studied but little to no research has focused on factors that promote low-severity fires, until now.

What drives low-severity fire in the southwestern USA?

Publications Posted on: April 23, 2018
Many dry conifer forests in the southwestern USA and elsewhere historically (prior to the late 1800’s) experienced fairly frequent surface fire at intervals ranging from roughly five to 30 years. Due to more than 100 years of successful fire exclusion, however, many of these forests are now denser and more homogenous, and therefore they have a greater probability of experiencing stand-replacing fire compared to prior centuries.

High-severity fire: Evaluating its key drivers and mapping its probability across western US forests

Publications Posted on: April 23, 2018
Wildland fire is a critical process in forests of the western United States (US). Variation in fire behavior, which is heavily influenced by fuel loading, terrain, weather, and vegetation type, leads to heterogeneity in fire severity across landscapes. The relative influence of these factors in driving fire severity, however, is poorly understood.

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