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Keyword: wilderness

Fire Lab tree list: A tree-level model of the western US circa 2009 v1

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
Maps of the number, size, and species of trees in forests across the western United States are desirable for many applications such as estimating terrestrial carbon resources, predicting tree mortality following wildfires, and for forest inventory.

Mapping wilderness character in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

Publications Posted on: April 26, 2017
A GIS-based approach was used to depict how threats to wilderness character vary in extent and magnitude across the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Based on the interagency strategy to monitor wilderness character, Keeping It Wild: An Interagency Strategy for Monitoring Wilderness Character Across the National Wilderness Preservation System (Landres et al.

The US Wilderness Managers Survey: Charting a path for the future

Publications Posted on: November 18, 2016
The Wilderness Manager Survey (WMS) was developed in 2014 to support interagency strategic planning for the National Wilderness Preservation System (NWPS) and asked managers about their perceived threats to the NWPS, the need for science information to support decisionmaking, the need for education and training, and the most important problems for managers in the future. The WMS was administered during Feb.

Wildland fire: Nature’s fuel treatment

Media Gallery Posted on: September 14, 2016
In recent decades, many landscapes across the western United States have experienced substantial fire activity. These fires consume fuels and alter vegetation structure, which may be able to serve as a natural fuel treatment in the same manner as mechanical treatments or prescribed fire. Knowing that fire occurrence, size, and severity are limited by recent wildfires should provide greater flexibility and confidence in managing fire incidents and managing for resource benefit. Specifically, fire managers can use the findings from this study to help predict whether a previous fire will act as a fuel treatment based on fire age, forest type, and expected weather.

Wildland fire: Nature’s fuel treatment

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 14, 2016
In recent decades, many landscapes across the western United States have experienced substantial fire activity. These fires consume fuels and alter vegetation structure, which may be able to serve as a natural fuel treatment in the same manner as mechanical treatments or prescribed fire. Knowing that fire occurrence, size, and severity are limited by recent wildfires should provide greater flexibility and confidence in managing fire incidents and managing for resource benefit. Specifically, fire managers can use the findings from this study to help predict whether a previous fire will act as a fuel treatment based on fire age, forest type, and expected weather.

Weather, fuels, and topography impede wildland fire spread in western US landscapes

Publications Posted on: August 30, 2016
As wildland fire activity continues to surge across the western US, it is increasingly important that we understand and quantify the environmental drivers of fire and how they vary across ecosystems. At daily to annual timescales, weather, fuels, and topography are known to influence characteristics such as area burned and fire severity.

Wildland fire deficit and surplus in the western United States

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 25, 2016
The natural role of fire has been disrupted in many regions of the western United States due to the influence of human activities, which have the potential to both exclude or promote fire, resulting in a “fire deficit” or “fire surplus”, respectively. Consequently, land managers need to better understand current departures from natural levels of fire activity, especially given the desire to maintain and restore resilient landscapes. 

Evaluation of storage and filtration protocols for alpine/subalpine lake water quality samples

Publications Posted on: August 18, 2016
Many government agencies and other organizations sample natural alpine and subalpine surface waters using varying protocols for sample storage and filtration. Simplification of protocols would be beneficial if it could be shown that sample quality is unaffected.

A special issue of the Journal of Forestry - Wilderness science and its role in wilderness stewardship

Science Spotlights Posted on: June 17, 2016
The Journal of Forestry dedicated an entire issue to wilderness science and the National Wilderness Preservation System under the management of the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Departement of Agriculture Forest Service.

The evolution of wilderness social science and future research to protect experiences, resources, and societal benefits

Publications Posted on: June 07, 2016
The historic Wilderness Act celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2014, and wilderness social science shared a similar legacy. As paradoxical as it might seem, humans are an important part of wilderness, helping to define the very concept and representing an important component of wilderness use and management.

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