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Keyword: white pine blister rust

Proactive limber pine conservation strategy for the Greater Rocky Mountain National Park Area

Publications Posted on: February 22, 2019
This proactive conservation strategy addresses the unique situation of limber pine in the Greater Rocky Mountain National Park Area (GRMNPA). The target area includes Rocky Mountain National Park and surrounding areas of northern Colorado and southern Wyoming.

Is it southwestern white pine (Pinus strobiformis), limber pine (P. flexilis), or a hybrid?

Projects Posted on: October 05, 2018
Both southwestern white pine and limber pine are threatened by the non-native pathogen Cronartium ribicola that causes the lethal disease white pine blister rust. Identifying genetic resistance to white pine blister rust in the pines and planting seedlings with those resistance traits are critical components of proactive and restoration strategies to conserve and sustain the species.

Regeneration for Resilience framework to support regeneration decisions for species with populations at risk of extirpation by white pine blister rust

Projects Posted on: October 05, 2018
The Regeneration for Resilience (R4R) framework provides a decision structure to prioritize limited resources to manage and increase the resilience of pine stands against the risk of extirpation by white pine blister rust. Effective management of forest regeneration dynamics can increase forest resilience and adaptive capacity to mitigate impacts of invasive species.

Regeneration for resilience framework to support regeneration decisions for species with populations at risk of extirpation by white pine blister rust

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2018
Natural forests are increasingly invaded by nonnative pests and pathogens that threaten host species with population extirpation and cascading ecological impacts.

Historic range of variability for upland vegetation in the Medicine Bow National Forest, Wyoming

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
An approach for synthesizing the results of ecological research pertinent to land management is the analysis of the historic range of variability (HRV) for key ecosystem variables that are affected by management activities. This report provides an HRV analysis for the upland vegetation of the Medicine Bow National Forest in southeastern Wyoming.

Historic range of variability for upland vegetation in the Bighorn National Forest, Wyoming

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
An approach for synthesizing the results of ecological research pertinent to land management is the analysis of the historic range of variability (HRV) for key ecosystem variables that are affected by management activities. This report provides an HRV analysis for the upland vegetation of the Bighorn National Forest in northcentral Wyoming.

Interactions of landscape disturbances and climate change dictate ecological pattern and process: spatial modeling of wildfire, insect, and disease dynamics under future climates

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2017
Context: Interactions among disturbances, climate, and vegetation influence landscape patterns and ecosystem processes. Climate changes, exotic invasions, beetle outbreaks, altered fire regimes, and human activities may interact to produce landscapes that appear and function beyond historical analogs.

Conservation of bristlecone pine – proactive management today and resources for tomorrow

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 23, 2017
Rocky Mountain bristlecone pines are long-lived, exhibit delayed maturation, have low genetic diversity, and inhabit cold, high-elevation environments. They are threatened by the non-native disease white pine blister rust, warming temperatures, changing precipitation patterns, and altered disturbance regimes. Sustaining bristlecone pine populations is essential to (1) maintain healthy mountain-top ecosystems and (2) ensure that the young bristlecone pine trees of today and tomorrow have the opportunity to achieve great age with picturesque gnarled trunks and wind-swept canopies for future generations to experience and enjoy.  

Evaluating future success of whitebark pine ecosystem restoration under climate change using simulation modeling

Publications Posted on: August 08, 2017
Major declines of whitebark pine forests throughout western North America from the combined effects of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks, fire exclusion policies, and the exotic disease white pine blister rust (WPBR) have spurred many restoration actions.

Range-wide conservation of Pinus aristata: A genetic collection with ecological context for proactive management today and resources for tomorrow

Publications Posted on: May 24, 2017
Tree species are highly vulnerable to anthropogenic environmental change, and are increasingly being challenged by non-native pests and climate change. Rocky Mountain bristlecone pines are long-lived, exhibit delayed maturation, have low genetic diversity, and inhabit cold, high-elevation environments.

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