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Keyword: weeds

Are invasive plants more abundant in the introduced versus native range?

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2018
Many invasion hypotheses postulate that introducing species to novel environments allows some organisms to escape population controls within the native range to attain higher abundance in the introduced range. However, introductions may also allow inherently successful species access to new regions where they may flourish without increasing in abundance.

Hybridization between Dalmatian and yellow toadflax

Media Gallery Posted on: May 12, 2017
Two closely related invasive Linaria species, Dalmatian toadflax and yellow toadflax, have successfully invaded a broad range of ecosystems throughout most of continental North America. The management challenge imposed by the landscape scale of many toadflax infestations, particularly in the West, is further complicated by hybridization between these two weeds.

Looks aren’t everything: Hybridization between dalmatian and yellow toadflax

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 11, 2017
Two closely related invasive Linaria species, Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria Dalmatica) and yellow toadflax (Linaria vulgaris), have successfully invaded a broad range of ecosystems throughout most of continental North America. The management challenge imposed by the landscape scale of many toadflax infestations, particularly in the West, is further complicated by hybridization between these two weeds. Herbicide and biological control treatments for invasive Linaria are highly species-specific, necessitating the development of a molecular diagnostic tool to accurately confirm when cryptic hybridization has spontaneously occurred in the field, and habitat suitability modeling to predict areas most vulnerable to hybrid invasion.

The bane of weed management: Secondary invasions

FS News Posted on: August 03, 2016
Exotic plant invaders are global threats to ecosystems and millions of dollars are spent each year to fight invasions. A new study shows that current treatment methods could inadvertently promote a second invasion by exotic plants instead of desired native plants and negatively impact ecosystem restoration.

Rangeland resource trends in the United States: A technical document supporting the 2000 USDA Forest Service RPA Assessment

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This report documents trends in America's rangelands as required by the Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974. The Forest Service has conducted assessments of the rangeland situation for 30 years. Over this period, rangeland values and uses have gradually shifted from concentrating upon forage production and meeting increasing demand for red meat to a more broad-based understanding under a framework of sustainable resource management.

Forecasting the influence of climate change on invasive weeds and weed biological control

Science Spotlights Posted on: February 10, 2016
Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists are investigating how climate change, namely elevated levels of CO2, might impact invasive species and classical biological control of weeds. A mechanistic approach to understanding how climate change may impact interactions between invasive plants and their biocontrol agents is essential for realistically addressing management needs under likely future field conditions.

A new look at the race for survival: Cheatgrass biocontrol with “black fingers of death”

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 09, 2015
Cheatgrass is one of the most destructive plant invaders in the West with significant economic and ecological impacts on rangelands and agricultural lands. The seed pathogen "black fingers of death" is a promising tool under consideration for biocontrol of cheatgrass. Understanding the effects of slow-growing versus fast-growing pathogen strains may be the key to successfully slow down or stop cheatgrass seed germination.

Forecasting the influence of climate change on invasive weeds and biological control

Projects Posted on: April 28, 2015
Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists are investigating how climate change, namely elevated levels of CO2, might impact invasive species and classical biological control of weeds.

Proceedings of the XIII International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds; September 11-16, 2011; Waikoloa, Hawaii, USA

Publications Posted on: September 25, 2013
A total of 208 participants from 78 organizations in 19 countries gathered at the Waikoloa Beach Marriott on the Big Island of Hawaii on September 11-16, 2011 for the XIII International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds.

Southern Idaho student "bug crews": Weeds, youth, and biocontrol in the rangelands of Idaho

Publications Posted on: November 17, 2011
Biological control of noxious weeds is an effective and widespread method often used by rangeland managers in the western United States. However, once biological control agents, usually insects, are released onto public and private lands there are few, if any, programs to follow up and monitor the effectiveness of these agents. A technique being used by some land managers is the use of student crews to implement monitoring programs.

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