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Keyword: weed management

Secondary invasion re-redefined: The distinction between invader-facilitated and invader-contingent invasions as subclasses of secondary invasion

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2018
In their recent article in Ecology and Evolution, O’Loughlin and Green (2017) set out to (1) redefine the term secondary invasion as the condition "when invader success is contingent on other invaders altering the properties of recipient ecosystems" and (2) propose a framework for accounting for this phenomenon in invasion ecology. We applaud the second objective.

Invasive Species Science Update (No. 9)

Publications Posted on: April 07, 2017
This newsletter is designed to keep managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, as well as to highlight breaking news related to invasive species issues.

Biology and biological control of Dalmatian and yellow toadflax

Publications Posted on: August 30, 2016
Dalmatian toadflax, Linaria dalmatica (L.) Mill., and yellow toadflax, Linaria vulgaris Mill., are exotic weeds of rangeland, grassland, forests, and cropland. Both Dalmatian and yellow toadflax are short-lived perennial forbs that are easily recognized by their yellow snapdragon- like flowers (Figure 1a, 1b).

Forecasting the influence of climate change on invasive weeds and weed biological control

Science Spotlights Posted on: February 10, 2016
Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists are investigating how climate change, namely elevated levels of CO2, might impact invasive species and classical biological control of weeds. A mechanistic approach to understanding how climate change may impact interactions between invasive plants and their biocontrol agents is essential for realistically addressing management needs under likely future field conditions.

The ‘dirt napping’ stem miner: Potential for classical biocontrol of yellow and hybrid toadflax

Projects Posted on: May 11, 2015
Optimizing classical biological control through the deployment of environmentally resilient agents may provide a sustainable, cost-effective and selective management option for large scale infestations of fire adapted weeds. Ongoing research is exploring the efficacy of a candidate agent, the stem mining weevil Mecinus heydenii, for biocontrol for invasive toadflax.

Forecasting the influence of climate change on invasive weeds and biological control

Projects Posted on: April 28, 2015
Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists are investigating how climate change, namely elevated levels of CO2, might impact invasive species and classical biological control of weeds.

Observational monitoring of biological control vs. herbicide to suppress leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula) for eight years

Publications Posted on: September 25, 2013
The effectiveness of Aphthona flea beetles (87 percent A. lacertosa Rosenhauer and A. czwalinae Weise, and 13 percent A. nigriscutis Foudras) as biological control agents of leafy spurge, Ephorbia esula L. was compared with a single application of herbicide (picloram) and untreated plots for a period of 8 years. Percentage of cover of leafy spurge, grasses; and flea beetle numbers were measured each year from 2000 through 2007.

Applying the successional weed management model for revegetating a yellow starthistle-infested dryland pasture in the Chihuahuan Desert

Publications Posted on: December 28, 2011
A three-year study was conducted in the Chihuahuan Desert in Southwestern New Mexico to evaluate the effectiveness of revegetating a dryland pasture that was heavily infested with yellow starthistle within the context of the successional weed management model.

Weed biocontrol insects reduce native plant recruitment through second-order apparent competition

Publications Posted on: September 02, 2008
Small-mammal seed predation is an important force structuring native-plant communities that may also influence exotic-plant invasions. In the intermountain West, deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are prominent predators of native-plant seeds, but they avoid consuming seeds of certain widespread invasives like spotted knapweed (Centaurea maculosa). These mice also consume the biological-control insects Urophora spp.

Monitoring invasive plants using hand-held GIS technology

Publications Posted on: June 09, 2006
Successful control of invasive species requires a clear picture of the spatial extent of infestations. The latest mapping technology involves coupling global position systems and handheld computers running geographic information systems software in the field. A series of workshops applying this technology to mapping weeds was developed and presented to Weed Management Areas across Arizona.