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Keyword: watershed

Biological diversity in montane riparian ecosystems: The case of the Mexican spotted owl

Publications Posted on: August 06, 2010
Although usually considered to be a bird of old growth mixed conifer forests, the Mexican spotted owl historically occurred in a wide range of habitats from lowland cottonwood bosques to montane canyon systems.

Status and migration of the Southwestern willow flycatcher in New Mexico

Publications Posted on: August 06, 2010
In the Southwestern United States, recent degradation of riparian habitats has been linked to decline of the Southwestern subspecies of the Willow Flycatcher. During a 2-year banding effort, migration patterns and bird fat content were analyzed. Recommendations for managers, and outlines for conservation plans, are included.

Bird migration through Middle Rio Grande riparian forests, 1994 to 1997

Publications Posted on: August 06, 2010
Expanding human populations in the middle Rio Grande have increased demands on water, land, and other resources, potentially disrupting bird migration activities. From 1994 to 1997, a total of 26,350 birds of 157 species were banded and studied. Results include species composition, timing of migration, and habitat use. Recommendations for managers are included.

Maternity roosts of bats at the Bosque Del Apache National Wildlife Refuge: A preliminary report

Publications Posted on: August 06, 2010
Historic and recent changes in the structure, composition, and distribution of riparian forests have likely influenced populations of bats through their effects on habitat quality for reproductive females.

Integrated surface management for pipeline construction: The Mid-America Pipeline Company Four Corners Project

Publications Posted on: August 06, 2010
Integrated surface management techniques for pipeline construction through arid and semi-arid rangeland ecosystems are presented in a case history of a 412-mile pipeline construction project in New Mexico. Planning, implementation and monitoring for restoration of surface hydrology, soil stabilization, soil cover, and plant species succession are discussed.

Using GIS technology to analyze and understand wet meadow ecosystems

Publications Posted on: August 06, 2010
A Cibola National Forest wet meadow restoration was implemented as part of the Forest Road 49 enhancement near Grants, New Mexico. An Arc/View 3.0 Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to track the recovery of this ecosystem. Layers on topography, hydrology, vegetation, soils and human alterations were compiled using a GPS and commonly available data.

Influence of mycorrhizal source and seeding methods on native grass species grown in soils from a disturbed site

Publications Posted on: August 06, 2010
Mycorrhizal fungi are crucial elements in native plant communities and restoring these fungi to disturbed sites is known to improve revegetation success. We tested the seedball method of plant dispersal for restoration of plants and mycorrhizal fungi to disturbed ecosystems. We tested the seedball method with a native mycorrhizal fungi inoculum, and a commercial inoculum.

Sevilleta Long-Term Ecological Research Program: Measuring ecosystem reponses to environmental change

Publications Posted on: August 06, 2010
The purpose of this paper is to describe the research program of the Sevilleta Long-Term Ecological Research Program (LTER) at the University of New Mexico. Details and data for each of the research topics described can be found in the Sevilleta LTER Internet Homepage (http://sev.lternet.edu/).

Restoration and monitoring in the Middle Rio Grande Bosque: Current status of flood pulse related efforts

Publications Posted on: August 06, 2010
Extensive regulation of the Middle Rio Grande's natural flow regime, together with the effects of introduced tree species, landscape fragmentation, and increasing wildfires, are obstacles for any level of restoration of its native riparian forest (bosque). However, carefully monitored partial restoration is possible and greatly needed to prevent the bosque's serious decline.

Establishment of Rio Grande cottonwood seedlings using micro-irrigation of xeric flood plain sites

Publications Posted on: August 06, 2010
Flood control, irrigation structures, and flow control practices on the Middle Rio Grande have prevented the deposition of sediments and hydrologic conditions conducive to the germination and establishment of Rio Grande cottonwood (Populus fremontii S. Wats.).

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