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Keyword: water yield

History of watershed research in the Central Arizona Highlands

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
The Central Arizona Highlands have been the focus of a wide range of research efforts designed to learn more about the effects of natural and human induced disturbances on the functioning, processes, and components of the region's ecosystems.

Modeled historical streamflow metrics for the contiguous United States and National Forest Lands

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
Available water supply varies greatly across the United States depending on topography, climate, elevation and geology. Forested and mountainous locations, such as national forests, tend to receive more precipitation than adjacent non-forested or low-lying areas. However, contributions of national forest lands to regional streamflow volumes is largely unknown.

National forest contributions to streamflow: Water yield maps and comparison with Brown et al. [2016]

Pages Posted on: March 08, 2016
We estimate the mean annual water yield from each HUC8 watershed to illustrate these contrasts across the landscape of the contiguous United States. We demonstrate the important role that national forests play as a source of water supply, and we compare our estimates to those from Brown et al. [2016].

High resolution images for contiguous United States water yield

Documents and Media Posted on: March 08, 2016
High resolution images associated with 'Contribution of national forests to contiguous United States water yield' (available for download). Document Type: Photos

National forest contributions to streamflow

Projects Posted on: February 03, 2016
Forested and mountainous locations, such as national forests, tend to receive more precipitation than adjacent non-forested or low-lying areas. However the precise contributions of national forest lands to regional streamflow volumes is largely unknown. New modeling work illustrates the importance of water yield from National Forest System land to water quantity and quality through visual and textual presentations of each forest’s contributions to regional streamflow.

Annual water supply of the contiguous United States

Science Spotlights Posted on: December 07, 2015
Fresh water begins as precipitation falling on the land and fresh waters. Water naturally evaporates from the land or vegetation, percolates down to groundwater aquifers, or flows toward the sea via rivers and streams. Water that evaporates is unavailable for use until it falls again elsewhere as precipitation. What remains is available for use by humans and other species and in a broad sense is our fresh water supply.

Simulating long-term landcover change and water yield dynamics in a forested, snow-dominated Rocky Mountain watershed

Publications Posted on: July 28, 2015
Changes in the extent, composition, and configuration of forest cover over time due to succession or disturbance processes can result in measurable changes in streamflow and water yield. Removal of forest cover generally increases streamflow due to reduced canopy interception and evapotranspiration.

Evaluation of climatic data, post-treatment water yield and snowpack differences between closed and open stands of lodgepole pine on Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest

Publications Posted on: July 28, 2015
Data collection on Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest was initiated in 1992 and has expanded to the present time. A preliminary report was prepared to include data collection through the 1995 season (Farnes et aI, 1995). Some data was updated in Farnes et al, 1999. Since then, data has been collected but has not been edited, summarized or tabulated in electronic form.

Mean annual water supply of the contiguous United States

Science Spotlights Posted on: July 07, 2015
Water that evaporates is unavailable for use until it falls again elsewhere as precipitation. What remains is available for use by humans and other species, and in a broad sense is our fresh water supply (until it reaches the sea). RMRS researchers estimated water supply across the contiguous 48 states for the period 1981-2010. Political, administrative, and land cover boundaries were mapped over the gridded water supply estimates to indicate the amount of water available in respective land areas.

Mean annual renewable water supply of the contiguous United States

Documents and Media Posted on: July 01, 2015
We estimated water supply across the contiguous 48 states for the period 1981-2010. Political, administrative, and land cover boundaries were mapped over the gridded water supply estimates to indicate the amount of water that becomes available in respective land areas. Document Type: Briefing Papers

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