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Keyword: water availability

First global assessment of drylands

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 13, 2016
Drylands, characterized by scarcity of water, globally support about two billion people. While most of these people live in developing nations, drylands in North America cover an extensive area and have a variety of uses. Drylands are experiencing noticeable stress and degradation from increasing populations and a changing climate, so it is important to know the current conditions and changes that have occurred over time for sustainable management and restoration of these areas. Drylands, characterized by scarcity of water, globally support about two billion people. While most of these people live in developing nations, drylands in North America cover an extensive area and have a variety of uses. Drylands are experiencing noticeable stress and degradation from increasing populations and a changing climate, so it is important to know the current conditions and changes that have occurred over time for sustainable management and restoration of these areas. 

Growing native plants with biochar

Projects Posted on: April 16, 2015
Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists and their partners are evaluating biochar as a seed coating and as an amendment to nursery substrates to improve germination and growth of native plants. The goal is to reduce costs associated with restoring ecosystems.

Established native perennial grasses out-compete an invasive annual grass regardless of soil water and nutrient availability

Publications Posted on: August 15, 2012
Competition and resource availability influence invasions into native perennial grasslands by nonnative annual grasses such as Bromus tectorum. In two greenhouse experiments we examined the influence of competition, water availability, and elevated nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability on growth and reproduction of the invasive annual grass B. tectorum and two native perennial grasses (Elymus elymoides, Pascopyrum smithii).

Soil physical property changes at the North American long-term soil productivity study sites: 1 and 5 years after compaction

Publications Posted on: March 24, 2006
The impact of forest management operations on soil physical properties is important to understand, since management can significantly change site productivity by altering root growth potential, water infiltration and soil erosion, and water and nutrient availability.