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Keyword: water

Population increases and climate change point to future U.S. water shortages

FS News Posted on: February 28, 2019
* News release issued by the American Geophysical Union Climate change plus population growth are setting the stage for water shortages in parts of the U.S. long before the end of the century, according to a new study in the AGU journal Earth’s Future.

NorWeST stream temperature data summaries for the western U.S.

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
NorWeST is an interagency stream temperature database and model for the western United States containing data from over 20,000 unique stream locations. Temperature observations were solicited from state, federal, tribal, private, and municipal resource organizations and processed using a custom cleaning script developed by Gwynne Chandler. Summaries of daily, weekly, and monthly means, minima, and maxima are provided for observation years.

NorWeST modeled summer stream temperature scenarios for the western U.S.

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
NorWeST summer stream temperature scenarios were developed for all rivers and streams in the western U.S. from the > 20,000 stream sites in the NorWeST database where mean August stream temperatures were recorded.

Modeled historical streamflow metrics for the contiguous United States and National Forest Lands

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
Available water supply varies greatly across the United States depending on topography, climate, elevation and geology. Forested and mountainous locations, such as national forests, tend to receive more precipitation than adjacent non-forested or low-lying areas. However, contributions of national forest lands to regional streamflow volumes is largely unknown.

Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest daily average streamflow data: 1992-2001

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
This data publication contains daily average streamflow from October 1992 through September 2001 for 11 stream gauging stations located on the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (TCEF) which is located in the Little Belt Mountains of Central Montana, USA. Streamflow was measured at two locations on Tenderfoot Creek (Upper and Lower) as well as seven subwatersheds.

National forest climate change maps: Your guide to the future

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 17, 2017
The National Forest Climate Change Maps project was developed to meet the need of National Forest managers for information on projected climate changes at a scale relevant to decision making processes, including Forest Plans. The maps use state-of-the-art science and are available for every National Forest in the contiguous United States with relevant data coverage. Currently, the map sets include variables related to precipitation, air temperature, snow (including April 1 snow-water equivalent and snow residence time), and stream flow.

SnowEx: partnering with NASA to better understand snow in forested areas

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 11, 2017
More than one-sixth of the world’s population rely on seasonal snow for water. In the western U.S., nearly three-quarters of the annual streamflow that provides the water supply arrives as spring and summer melt from the mountain snowpacks. SnowEx is a science campaign that combines on-the-ground measurements with aerial and remote sensing to improve measurements and techniques for identifying the amount of water in snow. 

Effect of forest cover on water treatment costs

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 06, 2017
Intact forests preserve water quality in our lakes and streams, providing cost savings for municipal water providers. American water utilities spend millions of dollars protecting and improving their source water to ensure the delivery of safe drinking water. Knowing the value of this green infrastructure helps communities and land managers better steward the watersheds we rely on and helps the Forest Service better engage with stakeholders in watershed protection.

Effect of forest cover on water treatment costs

Publications Posted on: August 30, 2017
Please note: Due to copyright restrictions, this PDF is the submitted manuscript of the publication. The published version can be purchased on the Water Economics and Policy website here: http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S2382624X17500060.

Climate change and wildfire effects in aridland riparian ecosystems

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 24, 2017
A frequently discussed function of aridland riparian ecosystems is the contribution of woody riparian plants to breeding bird habitat. The structurally diverse, species-rich vegetation along many southwestern streams supports high densities of territories and nest sites for a variety of birds including several species of high conservation priority.A frequently discussed function of aridland riparian ecosystems is the contribution of woody riparian plants to breeding bird habitat. The structurally diverse, species-rich vegetation along many southwestern streams supports high densities of territories and nest sites for a variety of birds including several species of high conservation priority.

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