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Keyword: volcanic ash-cap soils

Conference wrap-up

Publications Posted on: February 20, 2007
My purpose is twofold: to review key messages from previous speakers and to offer some concepts that may help you link recently acquired information. When Mt. Mazama erupted about 7,000 years ago, its airborne ash and pumice fell on a wide variety of existing soils. This Mazama tephra was a new parent material for soil development (fig. 1).

Erosion Risks in Selected Watersheds for the 2005 School Fire Located Near Pomeroy, Washington on Predominately Ash-Cap Soils

Publications Posted on: February 20, 2007
A limited erosion potential analysis was carried out on the 50,000 acre School Fire. Three WEPP interfaces were used for the analysis, a GIS wizard, an online interface and a windows interface. Ten watersheds within the fire area were modeled with the GeoWEPP tool (a geo-spatial interface for WEPP, Water Erosion Predication Project). The watersheds covered 18,823 acres, or about 38 percent of the total burned area.

WEPP FuME Analysis for a North Idaho Site

Publications Posted on: February 20, 2007
A computer interface has been developed to assist with analyzing soil erosion rates associated with fuel management activities. This interface uses the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model to predict sediment yields from hillslopes and road segments to the stream network.

Chemical changes induced by pH manipulations of volcanic ash-influenced soils

Publications Posted on: February 20, 2007
Data from volcanic ash-influenced soils indicates that soil pH may change by as much as 3 units during a year. The effects of these changes on soil chemical properties are not well understood. Our study examined soil chemical changes after artificially altering soil pH of ash-influenced soils in a laboratory. Soil from the surface (0-5 cm) and subsurface (10-15 cm) mineral horizons were collected from two National Forests in northern Idaho.

The Grand Fir Mosaic Ecosystem -- History and Management Impacts

Publications Posted on: February 20, 2007
The Grand Fir Mosaic (GFM) ecosystem is found on ash-cap soils in some mid-elevation forests of northern Idaho and northeastern Oregon. Harvesting on GFM sites results in successional plant communities that are dominated by bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum) and western coneflower (Rudbeckia occidentalis), and have large populations of pocket gophers (Thomomys talpoides).

Economics of Soil Disturbance

Publications Posted on: February 20, 2007
Economic implications of soil disturbance are discussed in four categories: planning and layout, selection of harvesting systems and equipment, long-term site productivity loss, and rehabilitation treatments.

Ash cap influences on site productivity and fertilizer response in forests of the Inland Northwest

Publications Posted on: February 20, 2007
Data from 139 research sites throughout the Inland Northwest were analyzed for effects of ash cap on site productivity, nutrient availability and fertilization response. Stand productivity and nitrogen (N) fertilizer response were greater on sites with ash cap than on sites without. Where ash was present, depth of ash had no effect on site productivity or N fertilizer response.

Restoring and Enhancing Productivity of Degraded Tephra-Derived Soils

Publications Posted on: February 20, 2007
Soil restoration (sometimes termed enhancement) is an important strategy for sustaining the productivity of managed forest landscapes. Tephra-derived soils have unique physical and chemical characteristics that affect their response to disturbance and restoration. A variety of factors reduce forest productivity on degraded soils.

Volcanic Ash Soils: Sustainable Soil Management Practices, With Examples of Harvest Effects and Root Disease Trends

Publications Posted on: February 20, 2007
Sustainability protocols recognize forest soil disturbance as an important issue at national and international levels. At regional levels continual monitoring and testing of standards, practices, and effects are necessary for successful implementation of sustainable soil management. Volcanic ash-cap soils are affected by soil disturbance and changes to soil properties influence ecosystem responses such as productivity and hydrologic function.

Runoff and Erosion Effects after Prescribed Fire and Wildfire on Volcanic Ash-Cap Soils

Publications Posted on: February 20, 2007
After prescribed burns at three locations and one wildfire, rainfall simulations studies were completed to compare postfire runoff rates and sediment yields on ash-cap soil in conifer forest regions of northern Idaho and western Montana. The measured fire effects were differentiated by burn severity (unburned, low, moderate, and high).

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