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Keyword: UNICOR

Contrasting use of habitat, landscape elements, and corridors by grey wolf and golden jackal in central Iran

Publications Posted on: June 14, 2019
Context: Increasing carnivore-human conflict has threatened the survival of many carnivore species, thus evaluating habitat requirements, landscape connectivity and the protection of biological corridors is critical to guide conservation of carnivores.

Assessing the complex relationship between landscape, gene flow, and range expansion of a Mediterranean carnivore

Publications Posted on: June 14, 2019
Landscape resistance is often disregarded in studies of range expansions and population connectivity.

Predicting landscape connectivity for the Asian elephant in its largest remaining subpopulation

Publications Posted on: February 17, 2017
Landscape connectivity between protected areas is crucial for the conservation of megafauna. But often, corridor identification relies on expert knowledge that is subjective and not spatially synoptic. Landscape analysis allows generalization of expert knowledge when satellite tracking or genetic data are not available.

Connecting endangered brown bear subpopulations in the Cantabrian Range (north-western Spain)

Publications Posted on: September 20, 2016
The viability of many species depends on functional connectivity of their populations through dispersal across broad landscapes. This is particularly the case for the endangered brown bear in north-western Spain, with a total population of about 200 individuals in two subpopulations that are separated by a wide gap with low permeability.

A multi-scale assessment of population connectivity in African lions (Panthera leo) in response to landscape change

Publications Posted on: October 22, 2015
Habitat loss and fragmentation are among the major drivers of population declines and extinction, particularly in large carnivores. Connectivity models provide practical tools for assessing fragmentation effects and developing mitigation or conservation responses.

Wildlife dispersal ability and landscape connectivity in the northern Rocky Mountains

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 14, 2015
Increasing human populations have fueled urban development and land conversion, causing substantial loss and fragmentation of wildlife habitat. Researchers evaluated conditions for 108 different species across a large portion of the Northern Rockies in order to predict current and potential future patterns of fragmentation, prioritize keystone corridors for protection and enhancement, and identify which species in which places might require habitat restoration or assisted migration.

Combating wildlife habitat loss to human development and fragmentation in the Great Plains

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 14, 2015
Increasing human populations have fueled urban development and land conversion, causing substantial loss and fragmentation of wildlife habitat. In addition, climate change is expected to drive large-scale shifts in ecological conditions and geographic shifts in vegetation types. RMRS researchers found that species’ dispersal ability plays a larger role than its landscape resistance in determining connectivity. Specific information on habitat needs and connectivity issues for multiple species can better inform habitat management at landscape scales.

Assessing multi-taxa sensitivity to the human footprint, habitat fragmentation and loss by exploring alternative scenarios of dispersal ability and population size: A simulation approach

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2014
Quantifying the effects of landscape change on population connectivity is compounded by uncertainties about population size and distribution and a limited understanding of dispersal ability for most species. In addition, the effects of anthropogenic landscape change and sensitivity to regional climatic conditions interact to strongly affect habitat fragmentation and loss.

Evaluating the intersection of a regional wildlife connectivity network with highways

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2014
Reliable predictions of regional-scale population connectivity are needed to prioritize conservation actions. However, there have been few examples of regional connectivity models that are empirically derived and validated.

Evaluating population connectivity for species of conservation concern in the American Great Plains

Publications Posted on: October 23, 2013
Habitat loss and fragmentation are widely recognized as among the most important threats to global biodiversity. New analytical approaches are providing an improved ability to predict the effects of landscape change on population connectivity at vast spatial extents.