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Keyword: tree rings

Climatic drivers of ponderosa pine growth in central Idaho

Publications Posted on: December 04, 2018
Despite the widespread use of ponderosa pine as an important hydroclimate proxy, we actually understand very little about its climate response in the Northern Rockies. Here, we analyze two new ponderosa pine chronologies to investigate how climate influences annual growth.

Condition of live fire-scarred ponderosa pine twenty-one years after removing partial cross-sections

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2018
Concern over the effects of removing fire-scarred partial cross-sections may limit sampling of live ponderosa pine to reconstruct fire history. We report mortality rates for ponderosa pine trees 20 to 21 years after removing fire-scarred partial cross-sections to reconstruct fire history.

Advancing dendrochronological studies of fire in the United States

Publications Posted on: April 12, 2018
Dendroecology is the science that dates tree rings to their exact calendar year of formation to study processes that influence forest ecology (e.g., Speer 2010 [1], Amoroso et al., 2017 [2]). Reconstruction of past fire regimes is a core application of dendroecology, linking fire history to population dynamics and climate effects on tree growth and survivorship.

Fire and fuel treatments increase tree resistance to bark beetles

Science Spotlights Posted on: April 10, 2018
The frequency of fire in low-elevation coniferous forests in western North America has greatly declined since the late 1800s. In many areas, this has increased tree density, increased the proportion of shade-tolerant species, reduced resource availability, and increased forest susceptibility to forest insect pests and high-severity wildfire. This study investigated how low-intensity fire affects tree defenses and whether fuel treatments impact resistance to a mountain pine beetle outbreak.

Between the Lines: Tree Rings Hold Clues About a River’s Past

FS News Posted on: January 10, 2018
Hydrologists are looking centuries into the past to better understand an increasingly uncertain water future.

Gridded snow water equivalent reconstruction for Utah using Forest Inventory and Analysis tree-ring data

Publications Posted on: July 19, 2017
Snowpack observations in the Intermountain West are sparse and short, making them difficult for use in depicting past variability and extremes. This study presents a reconstruction of April 1 snow water equivalent (SWE) for the period of 1850–1989 using increment cores collected by the U.S. Forest Service, Interior West Forest Inventory and Analysis program (FIA).

GSD Update: Year in Review: Spotlight on 2016 Research by the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program

Publications Posted on: July 19, 2017
In this issue of the GSD Update, we take a look back at selected studies of the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program (GSD) that depict its strengths and focus areas. Significant results of recent research and science delivery by GSD scientists are highlighted. We feature program research that lines up with the strategic priorities of the USDA Forest Service and the Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS).

Archiving tree-ring specimens and data for the future

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 05, 2016
The Rocky Mountain Research Station is preparing more than 16,000 tree-ring specimens for permanent archiving. Each specimen is a unique record of the environmental conditions from which it came. This tree-ring specimen collection will be permanently archived at the only federally recognized tree-ring repository in the U.S., where its importance will grow as it is used in ways we cannot currently imagine.

Oldest known Engelmann spruce

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Age structure in a stand of very old-age Engelmann spruce is described. The site is at 3,505 m near treeline in the Fraser Experimental Forest in central Colorado. The site contains the oldest Engelmann spruce trees yet reported in the literature; the oldest tree is at least 852 years of age.

Low-severity fire increases tree defense against bark beetle attacks

Publications Posted on: April 21, 2016
Induced defense is a common plant strategy in response to herbivory. Although abiotic damage, such as physical wounding, pruning, and heating, can induce plant defense, the effect of such damage by large-scale abiotic disturbances on induced defenses has not been explored and could have important consequences for plant survival facing future biotic disturbances.

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