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Keyword: traditional ecological knowledge

Integrating traditional ecological knowledge with western science for optimal natural resource management

Publications Posted on: October 06, 2017
Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) has been recognized within indigenous communities for millennia; however, traditional ecological knowledge has received growing attention within the western science (WS) paradigm over the past twenty-five years.

Native American  student perspectives of challenges in natural resource higher education

Publications Posted on: March 22, 2017
Native Americans have vital interests in promoting forest management decisions based on sound science and consistent with cultural values to sustain and conserve tribal natural resources.

Wilderness in the Circumpolar North: searching for compatibility in ecological, traditional, and ecotourism values; 2001 May 15-16; Anchorage, AK

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
There are growing pressures on undeveloped (wild) places in the Circumpolar North. Among them are pressures for economic development, oil and gas exploration and extraction, development of geothermal energy resources, development of heavy industry close to energy sources, and lack of appreciation for "other" orientations toward wilderness resources by interested parties from broad geographical origins.

Human-side of Restoration Webinar Series

Events Posted on: March 15, 2016
The Human-side of Restoration Webinar Series explored how human communities and individual values, public opinions, and social structures interface with ecological restoration. The series allowed experts from the Rocky Mountain Research Station, other government research organization, universities, and management communities to share their insights and experiences with the “people part” of restoration.

Literature cited during webinar "Learning from our Ancestors"

Documents and Media Posted on: March 10, 2016
Presenters cited these sources during the Human Side of Restoration webinar Learning from our Ancestors: Combining ancient knowledge systems and modern science to achieve restoration. Document Type: Other Documents

Opportunities to utilize traditional phenological knowledge to support adaptive management of social-ecological systems vulnerable to changes in climate and fire regimes

Publications Posted on: March 03, 2016
The field of adaptive management has been embraced by researchers and managers in the United States as an approach to improve natural resource stewardship in the face of uncertainty and complex environmental problems. Integrating multiple knowledge sources and feedback mechanisms is an important step in this approach.

The Silalirijiit projects: Linking traditional ecological knowledge with technology-based climate modeling

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 11, 2015
“Silalirijiit” is an Inuktitut word that means "those who work with or think about weather." These projects link Inuit, Yupik, and Athabaskan knowledge with climate science to understand changing weather patterns and their impacts on the First Peoples.

Using traditional ecological knowledge as a basis for targeted forest inventory: paper birch (Betula papyrifera) in the US Great Lakes Region

Publications Posted on: April 08, 2014
Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) has been proposed as a basis for enhanced understanding of ecological systems and their management. TEK also can contribute to targeted inventories of resources not included in standard mensuration. We discuss the results of a cooperative effort between the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC) and USDA Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (FIA).

Growing pressures on Circumpolar North wilderness: A case for coordinated research and education

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
Pressures are growing on undeveloped (wild) places in the Circumpolar North. Among them are economic development, oil and gas exploration and extraction, development of geothermal energy resources, development of heavy industry close to energy sources, and lack of appreciation for “other” orientations toward wilderness resources.

Wilderness and well-being: Complexity, time, and psychological growth

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
This paper presents the argument for interdisciplinary wilderness research. The idea of interdisciplinarity is grounded in theories of emotion and psychological growth that are compatible with basic knowledge in other scientific disciplines, and in particular with concepts related to evolution.

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