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Keyword: topography

Characterizing persistent unburned islands within the Inland Northwest USA

Publications Posted on: July 01, 2019
Background: In the Inland Pacific Northwest of the United States, fire is a dominant driver of ecological change. Within wildfire perimeters, fire effects often vary considerably and typically include remnant patches of unburned islands. As fires reburn the landscape, some unburned islands remain persistently unburned.

Topographic and fire weather controls of contemporary fire refugia in forested ecosystems of northwestern North America

Publications Posted on: July 10, 2018
Fire refugia, sometimes referred to as fire islands, shadows, skips, residuals, or fire remnants, are an important element of the burn mosaic, but we lack a quantitative framework that links observations of fire refugia from different environmental contexts. Here, we develop and test a conceptual model for how predictability of fire refugia varies according to topographic complexity and fire weather conditions.

Next Generation Fire Severity Mapping

Tools Posted on: July 06, 2018
The Next Generation Fire Severity Mapping is a tool designed to depict the probability of high-severity fire, if a fire were to occur, for several ecoregions in the contiguous western U.S. Statistical models were used to generate “wall-to-wall” maps for 13 of the 19 ecoregions. 

Principles and practices for the restoration of ponderosa pine and dry mixed-conifer forests of the Colorado Front Range

Publications Posted on: January 26, 2018
Wildfires have become larger and more severe over the past several decades on Colorado’s Front Range, catalyzing greater investments in forest management intended to mitigate wildfire risks. The complex ecological, social, and political context of the Front Range, however, makes forest management challenging, especially where multiple management goals including forest restoration exist.

The spatially varying influence of humans on fire probability in North America

Publications Posted on: August 10, 2016
Humans affect fire regimes by providing ignition sources in some cases, suppressing wildfires in others, and altering natural vegetation in ways that may either promote or limit fire.

Digital surface, terrain, and canopy height models for the Bannock Creek unit of Boise Basin Experimental Forest in 2007

Datasets Posted on: August 27, 2015
The data publication contains 1 meter raster data sets for three different digital elevation models (DEM) for the Bannock Creek unit of the Boise Basin Experimental Forest in south central Idaho in November 2007. The first is a digital terrain model (DTM), which is the ground surface with all vegetation and human-made structures removed. The second is a digital surface model (DSM), which includes all vegetation and human-made structures.

Digital surface, terrain, and canopy height models for a portion of the Black Hills Experimental Forest in 2002

Datasets Posted on: August 27, 2015
The data publication contains 1 meter raster data sets for three different digital elevation models (DEM) for a portion of the Black Hills Experimental Forest in South Dakota in 2002. The first is a digital terrain model (DTM), which is the ground surface with all vegetation and human-made structures removed. The second is a digital surface model (DSM), which includes all vegetation and human-made structures.

Digital surface, terrain, and canopy height models for Priest River Experimental Forest in 2002

Datasets Posted on: August 27, 2015
The data publication contains 1 meter raster data sets for three different digital elevation models (DEM) for the Priest River Experimental Forest in north Idaho in 2002. The first is a digital terrain model (DTM), which is the ground surface with all vegetation and human-made structures removed. The second is a digital surface model (DSM), which includes all vegetation and human-made structures.

Forest types of the northern Rocky Mountains and their climatic controls

Publications Posted on: August 10, 2015
The purpose in this report is to describe the natural forest types of the northern Rocky Mountains in Montana and northern Idaho, to point out their natural distribution and chief silvical characteristics, and to show in what degree they are controlled by differences in topography and climate.

Landscape structure, groundwater dynamics, and soil water content influence soil respiration across riparian-hillslope transitions in the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest, Montana

Publications Posted on: July 28, 2015
Variability in soil respiration at various spatial and temporal scales has been the focus of much research over the last decade aimed to improve our understanding and parameterization of physical and environmental controls on this flux. However, few studies have assessed the control of landscape position and groundwater table dynamics on the spatiotemporal variability of soil respiration.

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