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Keyword: spruce bark beetle

What happens to lynx when beetles eat the forest?

Lab Notes Posted on: February 11, 2016
What happens to lynx when beetles eat the forest? Posted by Julie Chase, Rocky Mountain Research Station on February 5, 2016.

Canada lynx living in spruce beetle impacted forests

Projects Posted on: July 13, 2015
Canada lynx, and their primary prey snowshoe hares, live in high-elevation spruce-fir forests, which are increasingly modified by spruce-bark beetle outbreaks. The goal of our research is to combine lynx use of insect-impacted forests with measures of forest condition.  Our results will inform forest prescriptions that facilitate timber-salvage and lynx conservation.

Tracking Canada lynx in insect-impacted forests

Media Gallery Posted on: July 13, 2015
Canada lynx, and their primary prey snowshoe hares, live in high-elevation spruce-fir forests, which are increasingly modified by spruce-bark beetle outbreaks.  One important management question is how the timber from these insect-impacted forests can be salvaged in ways that also facilitate lynx conservation.  This issue is of particular concern since climate change is expected to increase the severity of insect-related disturbance in conifer forests. 

Lynx and snowshoe hare response to spruce-beetle tree mortality: Evaluating habitat suitability and timber salvage in spruce-fir forests

Projects Posted on: May 20, 2015
By 2013, a spruce beetle outbreak impacted 85% of the mature spruce-fir forests on the Rio Grande National Forest. These spruce-fir forests provided some of the highest quality lynx habitat in the state. The goal of this project is to research the forest structures and compositions that lynx and snowshoe hare depend within landscapes altered by spruce bark beetle outbreak, in relation to increased post-beetle forest management activities from timber salvage.

Modelling spruce bark beetle infestation probability

Publications Posted on: January 27, 2010
Spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) risk model, based on pure Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) stand characteristics in experimental and control plots was developed using classification and regression tree statistical technique under endemic pest population density. The most significant variable in spruce bark beetle infestation risk model was spruce basal area.