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Keyword: species of conservation concern

FIRE-BIRD: Habitat suitability model application tools for disturbance-associated woodpeckers

Tools Posted on: July 25, 2019
FIRE-BIRD is an ArcGIS spatial tool for applying habitat suitability models to generate maps that inform forest management planning. This tool focuses on disturbance-associated woodpecker species of conservation concern.

FIRE-BIRD: A GIS-based toolset for applying habitat suitability models to inform land management planning

Publications Posted on: June 20, 2019
Habitat suitability models can inform forest management for species of conservation concern. Models quantify relationships between known species locations and environmental attributes, which are used to identify areas most likely to support species of concern. Managers can then limit negative human impacts in areas of high suitability or conduct habitat improvements in areas of marginal suitability.

Twenty-five Southern Rockies alpine plant species found nowhere else

Science Spotlights Posted on: April 15, 2015
A recent collaboration has resulted in a definitive list of 609 vascular plant species and subspecies found in the alpine zone of the Southern Rocky Mountains. The Southern Rockies alpine plant species list shows the geographic distribution of each species and, in a major finding, documents 25 Southern Rockies alpine endemics--species that are found nowhere else in the world. 

Science-based management of public lands in southern Nevada [Chapter 11] (Executive Summary)

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Landmark legislation provides guiding principles for land management planning in southern Nevada and the rest of the United States. Such legislation includes, but is not limited to, the Forest Service Organic Administration Act of 1897 (16 U.S.C. 473-478, 479-482 and 551), National Park Service Organic Act of 1916 (U.S.C. Title 16, Secs.

Recreation use on federal lands in southern Nevada [Chapter 10] (Executive Summary)

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Providing for appropriate, diverse, and high quality recreation use of southern Nevada’s lands and ensuring responsible visitor use is an ongoing challenge for Federal agencies that manage much of this land (fig. 1.1). This chapter examines recreation on these Federal lands and addresses Sub-goal 2.4 in the SNAP Science Research Strategy (table 1.1).

Preserving heritage resources through responsible use of southern Nevada’s lands [Chapter 9] (Executive Summary)

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Southern Nevada’s cultural resources (heritage resources) include archeological remains, sacred sites, historic sites, and cultural landscapes of significance to Native Americans and many other cultural groups. Locating, maintaining, and protecting these special places are part of the mandate of Nevada’s Federal and state agencies.

Human interactions with the environment through time in southern Nevada [Chapter 8] (Executive Summary)

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Southern Nevada is rich in irreplaceable cultural resources that include archeological remains, historic sites, cultural landscapes, and other areas of significance to Native Americans and other cultural groups.

Maintaining and restoring sustainable ecosystems in southern Nevada [Chapter 7] (Executive Summary)

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Resource managers in southern Nevada are faced with the challenge of determining appropriate goals and objectives and developing viable approaches for maintaining and restoring sustainable ecosystems in the face of rapid socio-ecological and environmental change.

Species of conservation concern and environmental stressors: Local, regional and global effects [Chapter 6] (Executive Summary)

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Southern Nevada’s unique landscapes and landforms provide habitat for a diversity of plant and wildlife species of conservation concern including many locally and regionally endemic species.

Fire history, effects, and management in southern Nevada [Chapter 5] (Executive Summary)

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Fire can be both an ecosystem stressor and a critical ecosystem process, depending on when, where, and under what conditions it occurs on the southern Nevada landscape. Fire can also pose hazards to human life and property, particularly in the wildland/ urban interface (WUI).

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