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Keyword: soil management

Soil: The foundation of the ecosystem; effects of management activities on forest soils: Can we manage better?

Documents and Media Posted on: November 30, 2018
Since Aristotle considered soil in relation to plant nutrition (348-322 B.C.), knowledge of soils has made tremendous strides. The way we view soils has evolved from a focus on agriculture to modem views of soil from multiple perspectives, including that of soils as natural bodies, partitioners of water, a medium for plant growth, soils as ecosystems and ecosystem components, and soil as engineering materials. Document Type: Other Documents

Role of forest fuels in the biology and management of soil

Documents and Media Posted on: November 21, 2018
Microbial activities are the principal biological determinants of forest site quality. The energy source or substrate for most microbes is derived from soil organic matter (fuels). Microbial activities most critical to site quality are nitrification, dinitrogen fixation, decay, ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, and pathogensis. Research on these subjects supports the following conclusions.Document Type: Other Documents

Proceedings- Management and Productivity of Western-Montane Forest Soils (April 1990- Boise, ID)

Pages Posted on: November 19, 2018
Harvey, Alan E.; Neuenschwander, Leon F., compilers. 1991. Proceedings - Management and productivity of western-montane forest soils; 1990 April 10-12; Boise, ID. Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-GTR-280. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station. 254 p.

Soil management as an integral part of silvicultural systems

Documents and Media Posted on: October 10, 2018
Forest management is at a critical juncture. Concepts and strategies for managing forests to produce goods and services, yet maintain functioning visually pleasing forests, are being debated, developed, and implemented. A well designed and implemented silvicultural system is basic to good forest management. Means of protecting soil and all factors affecting soil properties must be integrated into silvicultural systems.Document Type: Other Documents

Maintaining soil productivity during forest or biomass-to-energy thinning harvests in the western United States

Documents and Media Posted on: September 19, 2018
Forest biomass thinnings, to promote forest health or for energy production, can potentially impact the soil resource by altering soil physical, chemical, and/or biological properties. The extent and degree of impacts within a harvest unit or across a watershed will subsequently determine if site or soil productivity is affected.Document Type: Other Documents

Productivity and soil properties 45 years after timber harvest and mechanical site preparation in western Montana

Publications Posted on: March 26, 2014
Site preparation following timber harvests is widely used to increase seedling establishment postharvest. Historically, dozer piling and ripping were the most common forms of site preparation in the Intermountain West. Less commonly, terracing of hill slopes was another form of site preparation on the Bitterroot National Forest in western Montana from 1961-1970 on marginally productive lands.

Decaying organic materials and soil quality in the Inland Northwest: A management opportunity

Publications Posted on: November 18, 2011
Organic debris, including wood residue, is important to the development and function of. forest soil. Organic matter stores nutrients and moisture plus it provides important habitats for microbes beneficial to tree growth. To protect long-term forest soil productivity, organic horizons and their parent materials should be maintained.

Maintaining soil productivity during forest or biomass-to-energy thinning harvests in the western United States

Publications Posted on: January 27, 2010
Forest biomass thinnings, to promote forest health or for energy production, can potentially impact the soil resource by altering soil physical, chemical, and/or biological properties. The extent and degree of impacts within a harvest unit or across a watershed will subsequently determine if site or soil productivity is affected.

Fall versus spring transplanting of container seedlings: A comparison of seedling morphology

Publications Posted on: November 05, 2008
Containerized seedlings of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii), sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), and western hemlock (Tsuga heterphylla) transplanted in the early fall and later in the early spring were compared for differences in stem diameter, height, root area, and shoot area. Fall-transplanted P.

George O. White State Park Forest Nursery - Licking, Missouri

Publications Posted on: November 05, 2008
The George O. White State Forest Nursery is owned and operated by the Missouri Department of Conservation. Our agency is responsible for the management of the fish, forest, and wildlife resources of the state.

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