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A new way to look at winter footprints

FS News Posted on: November 26, 2018
An innovative new project has discovered that animal footprints contain enough DNA to allow for species identification. Scientists have traditionally relied on snow-tracks and camera traps to monitor populations of rare carnivores, like Canada lynx, fishers and wolverines. These traditional techniques can tell part of, but not the entire story of an animal population, and are sometimes difficult to validate species identification. 

National forest climate change maps: your guide to the future

Projects Posted on: April 17, 2017
The National Forest Climate Change Maps project was developed to meet the need of National Forest managers for information on projected climate changes at a scale relevant to decision making processes, including Forest Plans.  The maps use state-of-the-art science and are available for every National Forest in the contiguous United States with relevant data coverage. Currently, the map sets include variables related to precipitation, air temperature, snow (including April 1 snow-water equivalent (SWE) and snow residence time), and stream flow.

SnowEx

Projects Posted on: January 30, 2017
This NASA-sponsored project will test a variety of sensors and techniques used to collect and improve airborne and ground-based measurements to determine the snow-water equivalent (SWE), or the amount of water held in snow, over different terrains. This is significant because much of the worlds’, including the western U.S.’s water supply is derived from snow in mountain environments. Better information on SWE can improve hazard forecasting, water availability predictions, and agricultural forecasting, among other things. The SnowEx team includes more than 100 scientists from universities and agencies across the U.S., Europe, and Canada.

Numerical modeling of coupled water flow and heat transport in soil and snow

Publications Posted on: August 18, 2016
A one-dimensional vertical numerical model for coupled water flow and heat transport in soil and snow was modified to include all three phases of water: vapor, liquid, and ice. The top boundary condition in the model is driven by incoming precipitation and the surface energy balance.

Soils [Chapter 5]

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This report describes the soils of the Lost Lake, West Glacier Lake, and East Glacier Lake watersheds of GLEES and presents the methods used in conducting both the field and laboratory work. In addition, general statements about the nature of the mapping units used in making the soil maps are provided.

Meteorology [Chapter 7]

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
GLEES is contained within the Snowy Range Observatory. This Observatory consists of many weather stations, precipitation monitors, and stream gages scattered throughout the Snowy Range. These sites have been operated by the Wyoming Water Research Center (WWRC) since 1968. Data from the sites are available from the WWRC and were last summarized by Wesche (1982).

Introduction [Chapter 1]

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Wilderness ecosystems in the United States are federally mandated and set aside by the Wilderness Act. They are managed to minimize human impact using methods that leave these systems, to the extent possible, in their natural state uninfluenced by manipulation or disruption by humans.

Hydrology [Chapter 9]

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Three Parshall flumes were installed within East and West Glacier Lakes watersheds during the summer of 1987. Each Parshall flume was prefabricated fiberglass construction fitted with a hypolon liner to bring as much groundwater flow as possible to the surface so that it could be measured by passing the water through the flume.

Aquatics [Chapter 6]

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Within the GLEES boundary there are three alpine lakes and several streams and ponds. The selection of GLEES as a research site for investigating of the effects of chemical and physical climate change was in part based on the accessibility of these low alkalinity "sensitive" aquatic ecosystems. This chapter provides a brief description of the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the GLEES aquatic ecosystems.

Appendix D: The Map Units for GLEES Soil Survey Area

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
The soils map of GLEES watersheds is shown in chap. 5, fig. 5.1 and the map units are described in this Appendix.

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