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Keyword: Sky Islands

A feather in their cap: Using citizen monitoring to track post-wildfire bird communities in the Arizona Sky Islands

Publications Posted on: November 29, 2018
The Sky Islands of southeastern Arizona, which consist of separate mountain ranges within a desert matrix, are a unique biodiversity hotspot hosting many neotropical bird species that cannot be seen anywhere else in the United States Residents of this region depend on ecotourism for their livelihood and there is an above-average concentration of citizens skilled at identifying birds by sight and sound.

A feather in their cap: Using citizen monitoring to track post-wildfire bird communities in the Arizona Sky Islands

Pages Posted on: September 07, 2018
Birders are an especially passionate lot of wildlife enthusiasts, often traveling long distances with expensive spotting scopes to add new species to their “life lists.” This quality of birders has long been harnessed for science, allowing researchers to gather data at a breadth and scale well beyond anything they could accomplish on their own. The longest running “citizen science” effort is the Christmas Bird Count, dating back to Christmas Day, 1900, when Audubon Society ornithologist Frank M. Chapman proposed the idea of counting birds during the holidays (rather than hunt them, so the story goes). Even now, from December 14 through January 5 each year, tens of thousands of volunteers still count birds at specific locations across the United States. Since the outset of this project, many more birding-related citizen science projects have been developed over the decades and recent initiatives take advantage of our growing global connectivity.

A feather in their cap: Using citizen monitoring to track post-wildfire bird communities

Documents and Media Posted on: September 04, 2018
RMRS researchers initiated a partnership with a local group, to assess the feasibility of using a citizen-monitoring program to collect bird population data. By comparing citizen-collected data with that collected by a professional crew, they found that citizen science partnerships can be used for inexpensive and statistically rigorous monitoring, with the added benefit of fostering greater local public involvement in science and conservation. Document Type: Other Documents

Monitoring bird communities with citizen science in the Sky Islands

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 25, 2016
This research evaluates the use of citizen science in a region with increased stress from ongoing drought and wildfires. Researchers show how it allows for inexpensive and statistically rigorous monitoring, and fosters greater local involvement in science and conservation. This information will be used to determine optimal protocols for a long-term monitoring plan. Inexpensive and statistically rigorous long-term monitoring fosters local involvement in science and conservation.

Quantitative approaches for evaluating fire effects on wildlife communities in National Forest Systems

Projects Posted on: April 14, 2015
Innovative quantitative approaches have been developed for evaluating wildfire and prescribed fire effects on wildlife communities in several western North American national forests.

Vascular plants diversity of El Aribabi Conservation Ranch: A private natural protected area in northern Sonora, Mexico

Publications Posted on: July 28, 2014
In northeastern Sonora, isolated Sky Island mountain ranges with desertscrub, desert grassland, oak woodland, and pine-oak forest have high biodiversity. El Aribabi Conservation Ranch in the Sierra Azul (from 30°51’13”N, 110°41’9”W to 30°46’38”N, 110°32’3”W) was designated a Private Protected Natural Area by the Comisión Nacional de Áreas Naturales Protegidas in March 2011. The flora contains 447 taxa in 81 families and 301 genera.

Mapping ecological systems in southeastern Arizona

Publications Posted on: December 10, 2013
Beginning in 2007 in and around the Huachuca Mountains, the Coronado National Forest and other partners have been mapping ecosystems at multiple scales. The approach has focused on identifying land type associations (LTA), which represent the sum of bedrock and superficial geology, topography, elevation, potential and existing vegetation, soil properties, and local climatic variables.

Mapping landscape phenology preference of yellow-billed cuckoo with AVHRR data

Publications Posted on: September 17, 2013
We mapped habitat for threatened Yellow-billed Cuckoo (Coccycus americanus occidentalis) in the State of Arizona using the temporal greenness dynamics of the landscape, or the landscape phenology.

Examining wildlife responses to phenology and wildfire using a landscape-scale camera trap network

Publications Posted on: September 17, 2013
Between 2001 and 2009, the Borderlands Jaguar Detection Project deployed 174 camera traps in the mountains of southern Arizona to record jaguar activity. In addition to jaguars, the motion-activated cameras, placed along known wildlife travel routes, recorded occurrences of ~ 20 other animal species.

Preliminary flora of Ojo de Agua Tonibabi, Sierra La Madera, Sonora, Mexico

Publications Posted on: September 17, 2013
Ejido Tonibabi is located 12 kilometers east-northeast of Moctezuma in east-central Sonora, México (29°50’16’’N 109°33’45’’W, 780 m elevation). The vegetation is riparian in the wetlands and foothills thornscrub on slopes. The flora was inventoried on transects in different areas in Ejido Tonibabi.

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