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Keyword: site productivity

Effects of heavy equipment on physical properties of soils and on long-term productivity: A review of literature and current research

Documents and Media Posted on: October 26, 2018
Soil disturbance caused by heavy equipment used for harvesting or site preparation can have negative effects on soil properties and long-term forest site productivity. Soil compaction, churning, rutting, mixing, displacement, and removal are types of disturbance that can reduce tree root growth through their influence on soil physical, chemical, and biological properties.Document Type: Other Documents

Erosion and site productivity in western-montane forest ecosystems

Documents and Media Posted on: October 17, 2018
Soil loss from erosion affects site productivity by reducing the nutrient pool and water-holding capacity of the soil and by direct damage to vegetation. The effects of erosion depend on the type of erosion processes because of differences in the depth and areal extent of soil loss, the downslope rate of soil movement, and the probability of redeposition of eroded material.Document Type: Other Documents

Influence of fire on factors that affect site productivity

Documents and Media Posted on: October 17, 2018
Presettlement fire played an important role in nutrient cycling, plant succession, diversity, and stand dynamics in coniferous forests of western North America. Prescribed fire can maintain site quality and contribute to control of insect and disease problems while reducing wildfire hazard. Fire effects on soils are largely governed by interactions between fuel consumption and soil characteristics that influence soil heating.Document Type: Other Documents

Maintaining soil productivity during forest or biomass-to-energy thinning harvests in the western United States

Documents and Media Posted on: September 19, 2018
Forest biomass thinnings, to promote forest health or for energy production, can potentially impact the soil resource by altering soil physical, chemical, and/or biological properties. The extent and degree of impacts within a harvest unit or across a watershed will subsequently determine if site or soil productivity is affected.Document Type: Other Documents

Impact of biomass harvesting on forest soil productivity in the northern Rocky Mountains

Publications Posted on: November 12, 2015
Biomass harvesting extracts an increased amount of organic matter from forest ecosystems over conventional harvesting. Since organic matter plays a critical role in forest productivity, concerns of potential negative long-term impacts of biomass harvesting on forest productivity (i.e., changing nutrient/water cycling, aggravating soil properties, and compaction) have emerged.

Productivity and soil properties 45 years after timber harvest and mechanical site preparation in western Montana

Publications Posted on: March 26, 2014
Site preparation following timber harvests is widely used to increase seedling establishment postharvest. Historically, dozer piling and ripping were the most common forms of site preparation in the Intermountain West. Less commonly, terracing of hill slopes was another form of site preparation on the Bitterroot National Forest in western Montana from 1961-1970 on marginally productive lands.

Effects of slash, machine passes, and soil moisture on penetration resistance in a cut-to-length harvesting

Publications Posted on: May 14, 2013
Multiple entries into forest stands are often needed for fire hazard reduction and ecosystem restoration treatments in the Inland-Northwest U.S.A. region. However, soil compaction occurring from mechanized harvesting operations often remains for many years and may contribute to a decline in long-term site productivity.

Site quality changes in response to slash retention and prescribed fire in thinned ponderosa pine forests

Publications Posted on: February 09, 2011
The ecological effects of post-thinning slash retention on vegetation, wildlife browse, and soil were evaluated in sixty-year-old stands of second-growth pine in central Oregon. Three slash-retention treatments were compared: whole-tree removal, bole-only removal, and thin no removal (boles and slash scattered on site).

Maintaining soil productivity during forest or biomass-to-energy thinning harvests in the western United States

Publications Posted on: January 27, 2010
Forest biomass thinnings, to promote forest health or for energy production, can potentially impact the soil resource by altering soil physical, chemical, and/or biological properties. The extent and degree of impacts within a harvest unit or across a watershed will subsequently determine if site or soil productivity is affected.

Forest Soil Disturbance Monitoring Protocol: Volume I: Rapid assessment

Publications Posted on: January 27, 2010
This volume of the Forest Soil Disturbance Monitoring Protocol (FSDMP) describes how to monitor forest sites before and after ground disturbing management activities for physical attributes that could influence site resilience and long-term sustainability. The attributes describe surface conditions that affect site sustainability and hydrologic function.

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