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Keyword: seed predation

Spicing up restoration: Can chili peppers improve restoration seeding by reducing seed predation?

Publications Posted on: July 08, 2019
Seed predation by rodents presents a significant barrier to native plant recruitment and can impede restoration seeding efforts. In nature, some plants contain secondary defense compounds that deter seed predators. If these natural defense compounds can be applied to unprotected seeds to inhibit rodent granivores, this approach could improve restoration seeding.

Invasive Species Science Update (No. 11)

Publications Posted on: June 10, 2019
In this issue, we cover new research ranging from using chili powder to improve native plant restoration, searching for a link between exotic white pine blister rust and mountain pine beetle resistance in limber pine, identifying how melting arctic sea ice could open new pathways for invasive species introductions, and research into a relatively newly established biocontrol agent for rush skeletonweed.

Rodent seed predators and a dominant grass competitor affect coexistence of co-occurring forb species that vary in seed size

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2018
Propagule size and number often vary by several orders of magnitude among co-occurring plant species. Explaining the maintenance of this variation and understanding how propagule size contributes to coexistence remain a central challenge for community ecologists.

Spicing up native plant restoration

FS News Posted on: August 29, 2018
Have you ever touched a hot pepper and then rubbed your eyes? Chances are you will not want to go near the pepper again. A new study found that you can use this same concept to deter rodents from eating seeds, thus protecting investments in native plant restoration efforts.

Spicing up restoration: Can chili peppers improve restoration seeding by reducing seed predation?

Publications Posted on: August 10, 2018
Seed predation by rodents presents a significant barrier to native plant recruitment and can impede restoration seeding efforts. In nature, some plants contain secondary defense compounds that deter seed predators. If these natural defense compounds can be applied to unprotected seeds to inhibit rodent granivores, this approach could improve restoration seeding.

Seedling establishment in a masting desert shrub parallels the pattern for forest trees

Publications Posted on: March 27, 2015
The masting phenomenon along with its accompanying suite of seedling adaptive traits has been well studied in forest trees but has rarely been examined in desert shrubs. Blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima) is a regionally dominant North American desert shrub whose seeds are produced in mast events and scatter-hoarded by rodents. We followed the fate of seedlings in intact stands vs.

Rodent seed predation as a biotic filter influencing exotic plant abundance and distribution

Publications Posted on: October 01, 2014
Biotic resistance is commonly invoked to explain why many exotic plants fail to thrive in introduced ranges, but the role of seed predation as an invasion filter is understudied. Abiotic conditions may also influence plant populations and can interact with consumers to determine plant distributions, but how these factors jointly influence invasions is poorly understood.

Granivory of invasive, naturalized, and native plants in communities differentially susceptible to invasion

Publications Posted on: October 01, 2014
Seed predation is an important biotic filter that can influence abundance and spatial distributions of native species through differential effects on recruitment. This filter may also influence the relative abundance of nonnative plants within habitats and the communities' susceptibility to invasion via differences in granivore identity, abundance, and food preference.

Biotic resistance via granivory: Establishment by invasive, naturalized, and native asters reflects generalist preference

Publications Posted on: March 20, 2012
Escape from specialist natural enemies is frequently invoked to explain exotic plant invasions, but little attention has been paid to how generalist consumers in the recipient range may influence invasion.

Vertebrate predators have minimal cascading effects on plant production or seed predation in an intact grassland ecosystem

Publications Posted on: August 31, 2011
The strength of trophic cascades in terrestrial habitats has been the subject of considerable interest and debate. We conducted an 8-year experiment to determine how exclusion of vertebrate predators, ungulates alone (to control for ungulate exclusion from predator exclusion plots) or none of these animals influenced how strongly a three-species assemblage of rodent consumers affected plant productivity.

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