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Keyword: seed bank

The hidden potential within soil seed banks

Science Spotlights Posted on: July 31, 2019
Wildfire and other disturbances to plant communities are becoming larger and more frequent across arid lands of the western U.S. Degradation caused by these disturbances affects the ability of these plant communities to deliver important food and shelter to wildlife. Understanding how to predict the presence of native seeds within the soil seed bank, and where there are abundant seeds of invasive species, will help land managers determine the regeneration potential within the seed bank and inform restoration planning to reestablish biodiversity and ecosystem function in disturbed areas. Wildfire and other disturbances to plant communities are becoming larger and more frequent across arid lands of the western U.S. Degradation caused by these disturbances affects the ability of these plant communities to deliver important food and shelter to wildlife. Understanding how to predict the presence of native seeds within the soil seed bank, and where there are abundant seeds of invasive species, will help land managers determine the regeneration potential within the seed bank and inform restoration planning to reestablish biodiversity and ecosystem function in disturbed areas.

Secondary dormancy induction and release in Bromus tectorum seeds: The role of temperature, water potential and hydrothermal time

Publications Posted on: January 24, 2017
Seeds of the winter annual Bromus tectorum lose primary dormancy in summer and are poised to germinate rapidly in the autumn. If rainfall is inadequate, seeds remain ungerminated and may enter secondary dormancy under winter conditions. We quantified conditions under which seeds enter secondary dormancy in the laboratory and field and also examined whether contrasting B. tectorum genotypes responded differently to dormancy induction cues.

Seed and soil dynamics in shrubland ecosystems: proceedings; 2002 August 12-16; Laramie, WY

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
The 38 papers in this proceedings are divided into six sections; the first includes an overview paper and documentation of the first Shrub Research Consortium Distinguished Service Award. The next four sections cluster papers on restoration and revegetation, soil and microsite requirements, germination and establishment of desired species, and community ecology of shrubland systems.

Mycelial growth rate and toxin production in the seed pathogen Pyrenophora semeniperda: Resource trade-offs and temporally varying selection

Publications Posted on: August 25, 2015
Pyrenophora semeniperda, an important pathogen in Bromus tectorum seed banks in semi-arid western North America, exhibits >4-fold variation in mycelial growth rate. Host seeds exhibit seasonal changes in dormancy that affect the risk of pathogen-caused mortality.

Granivory of invasive, naturalized, and native plants in communities differentially susceptible to invasion

Publications Posted on: October 01, 2014
Seed predation is an important biotic filter that can influence abundance and spatial distributions of native species through differential effects on recruitment. This filter may also influence the relative abundance of nonnative plants within habitats and the communities' susceptibility to invasion via differences in granivore identity, abundance, and food preference.

Contributions of seed bank and vegetative propagules to vegetation composition on prairie dog colonies in western South Dakota

Publications Posted on: June 26, 2013
Characterizing the contributions of the seed bank and vegetative propagules will enhance our understanding of community resiliency associated with prairie dog disturbances. Our objective was to determine the effects of ecological condition (EC) and distance from burrows on the soil seed bank and vegetative propagules.

Is Pyrenophora semeniperda the cause of downy brome (Bromus tectorum) die-offs?

Publications Posted on: June 26, 2013
Downy brome (cheatgrass) is a highly successful, exotic, winter annual invader in semi-arid western North America, forming near-monocultures across many landscapes. A frequent but poorly understood phenomenon in these heavily invaded areas is periodic 'die-off' or complete stand failure. The fungal pathogen Pyrenophora semeniperda is abundant in cheatgrass seed banks and causes high mortality.

A stochastic population model for Lepidium papilliferum (Brassicaceae), a rare desert ephemeral with a persistent seed bank

Publications Posted on: October 03, 2011
Population viability analysis (PVA) is a valuable tool for rare plant conservation, but PVA for plants with persistent seed banks is difficult without reliable information on seed bank processes. We modeled the population dynamics of the Snake River Plains ephemeral Lepidium papilliferum using data from an 11-yr artificial seed bank experiment to estimate age-specific vital rates for viability loss and germination.

A race for survival: Can Bromus tectorum seeds escape Pyrenophora semeniperda-caused mortality by germinating quickly?

Publications Posted on: October 03, 2011
Pathogen-seed interactions may involve a race for seed resources, so that seeds that germinate more quickly, mobilizing reserves, will be more likely to escape seed death than slow-germinating seeds. This race-for-survival hypothesis was tested for the North American seed pathogen Pyrenophora semeniperda on seeds of the annual grass Bromus tectorum, an invasive plant in North America.

Effect of fire on a seed bank pathogen and on seeds of its host Bromus tectorum

Publications Posted on: November 23, 2010
The generalist pathogen Pyrenophora semeniperda (Brittlebank and Adam) Shoemaker occurs primarily in cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) seed banks, where it causes high seed mortality (Beckstead et al. 2007; Meyer et al. 2007). How does fire impact survival of a fungal seed pathogen, P. semeniperda, versus survival of the seeds of its cheatgrass host, the invasive Bromus tectorum?

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