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Keyword: sagebrush ecosystems

Getting climate-smart with seeds: How a new software tool helps prepare landscapes for expected future conditions

Documents and Media Posted on: August 06, 2019
Sagebrush ecosystems are a major component of western U.S. landscapes and they provide vital habitat to a wide array of wildlife species, including greater sage-grouse and pygmy rabbits. However, in recent decades, sagebrush ecosystems have been reduced or degraded by a wide range of disturbances, including human development, overgrazing, severe fires, and encroachment by cheatgrass and pinyon-juniper woodlands. These factors are expected to continue or worsen with anticipated climate change. Document Type: Other Documents

Post-fire vegetation response at the woodland-shrubland interface is mediated by the pre-fire community

Publications Posted on: July 19, 2017
Understanding the drivers of ecosystem responses to disturbance is essential for management aimed at maintaining or restoring ecosystem processes and services, especially where invasive species respond strongly to disturbance.

A legacy of sagebrush science supports "The Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy"

Science Spotlights Posted on: November 22, 2016
The Rocky Mountain Research Station holds a long legacy in sagebrush and rangeland research dating back to the 1930s. With over 70 years of research on sagebrush ecosystem dynamics as well as mechanisms to manage for resilient and resistant sagebrush ecosystems, Forest Service scientists continue as a leading resource for providing sound science to the management of these landscapes.

A legacy of sagebrush science photo gallery

Media Gallery Posted on: November 22, 2016
The Rocky Mountain Research Station holds a long legacy in sagebrush and rangeland research dating back to the 1930s. With over 70 years of research on sagebrush ecosystem dynamics as well as mechanisms to manage for resilient and resistant sagebrush ecosystems, Forest Service scientists continue as a leading resource for providing sound science to the management of these landscapes.

Great Basin Factsheet Series 2016 - Information and tools to restore and conserve Great Basin ecosystems

Publications Posted on: November 17, 2016
Land managers are responsible for developing effective strategies for conserving and restoring Great Basin ecosystems in the face of invasive species, conifer expansion, and altered fire regimes. A warming climate is magnifying the effects of these threats and adding urgency to implementation of management practices that will maintain or improve ecosystem functioning.

Tapping soil survey information for rapid assessment of sagebrush ecosystem resilience and resistance

Publications Posted on: August 30, 2016
A new ecologically-based approach to risk abatement has emerged that can aid land managers in grappling with escalating impacts of large-scale wildfire and invasive annual grasses in sagebrush ecosystems, particularly in the Great Basin.

GSD Update: Year in Review: Spotlight on 2015 Research by the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program

Publications Posted on: March 23, 2016
In this issue of the GSD Update, we take a look back at selected studies of the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program (GSD) that depict its strengths and focus areas. Significant results of recent research and science delivery by GSD scientists are highlighted. We feature program research that lines up with the strategic research priorities of the USDA Forest Service and the Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS).

GSD Update: Year in Review: Spotlight on 2014 Research by the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program

Publications Posted on: April 15, 2015
In this issue of the GSD Update, we take a look back at selected studies of the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program (GSD) that depict its strengths and focus areas. Significant results of recent research and science delivery by GSD scientists are highlighted.

Restoring abandoned agricultural lands in cold desert shrublands: Tradeoffs between water availability and invasive species

Publications Posted on: September 28, 2014
Restoration of abandoned agricultural lands to create resilient ecosystems in arid and semi-arid ecosystems typically requires seeding or transplanting native species, improving plant-soil-water relations, and controlling invasive species. We asked if improving water relations via irrigation or surface mulch would result in negative tradeoffs between native species establishment and invasive species competition.

A review of fire effects on vegetation and soils in the Great Basin Region: response and ecological site characteristics

Publications Posted on: November 26, 2013
This review synthesizes the state of knowledge on fire effects on vegetation and soils in semi-arid ecosystems in the Great Basin Region, including the central and northern Great Basin and Range, Columbia River Basin, and the Snake River Plain.

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