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Keyword: sagebrush

New research provides scientific framework for conserving iconic sagebrush landscapes

FS News Posted on: April 15, 2019
An unprecedented conservation effort is underway across 11 Western states to address threats to sagebrush ecosystems and the many species that depend on them. Today, the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Interior released the Science Framework for Conservation and Restoration of the Sagebrush Biome (Part 2). The Science Framework provides a transparent, ecologically responsible approach for making policy and management decisions for sagebrush landscapes.

Climate-based seed transfer of a widespread shrub: population shifts, restoration strategies, and the trailing edge

Publications Posted on: December 17, 2018
Genetic resources have to be managed appropriately to mitigate the impact of climate change. For many wildland plants, conservation will require knowledge of the climatic factors affecting intraspecific genetic variation to minimize maladaptation.

Jumpstarting Recovery of Wyoming Big Sagebrush and Other Native Plants out on the Range

Pages Posted on: December 07, 2018
Wyoming big sagebrush two years after being seeded in the Great Basin (photo courtesy of M.</body></html>

Fire effects on herbaceous regeneration across an invasion gradient in grasslands and shrublands

Projects Posted on: November 02, 2018
Post-fire resiliency of plant communities in northern mixed-grass prairie and eastern sagebrush steppe depends largely on plant regeneration from aboveground and belowground buds. Canopy and stem regeneration occurs more quickly via the bud bank than via seedling recruitment. To better predict plant community responses to fire, we need an enhanced understanding of the immediate and long-term bud responses of key forb, grass, and shrub species to fire.  

A conservation planning tool for Greater Sage-grouse using indices of species distribution, resilience, and resistance

Publications Posted on: July 10, 2018
Managers require quantitative yet tractable tools that identify areas for restoration yielding effective benefits for targeted wildlife species and the ecosystems they inhabit.

Advancing evaluation of resilience to disturbance and resistance to exotic annual grass invasion in the Great Basin

Projects Posted on: May 10, 2018
We will deliver a spatially explicit predictive tool depicting resilience to disturbance and resistance to cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) invasion across the Great Basin.

GSD Update: Year in Review: Spotlight on 2017 Research by the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program

Publications Posted on: April 10, 2018
In this issue of the GSD Update, we feature selected studies of the RMRS Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program (GSD) that focus on the theme of fire. Significant results of recent research and science delivery by GSD scientists are highlighted. We feature program research that lines up with the strategic priorities and goals of the USDA Forest Service (USFS).

Flower phenology and climate data for Artemisia tridentata populations

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
This data publication contains 2012 flowering data for the 52 populations of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) grown in 3 garden locations: Majors Flat and Ephraim in Idaho, as well as Orchard, Idaho. Data include geographical details, subspecies, julian date of flowering, and population climate variable information.

Spectrophotometry of Artemisia tridentata to quantitatively determine subspecies

Publications Posted on: January 09, 2018
Ecological restoration is predicated on our abilities to discern plant taxa. Taxonomic identification is a first step in ensuring that plants are appropriately adapted to the site. An example of the need to identify taxonomic differences comes from big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata). This species is composed of three predominant subspecies occupying distinct environmental niches, but overlap and hybridization are common in ecotones.

Effects of climate change on rangeland vegetation in the northern Rockies [Chapter 6]

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2017
A longer growing season with climate change is expected to increase net primary productivity of many rangeland types, especially those dominated by grasses, although responses will depend on local climate and soil conditions. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide may increase water use efficiency and productivity of some species.

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