You are here

Keyword: sage-grouse

A conservation planning tool for Greater Sage-grouse using indices of species distribution, resilience, and resistance

Publications Posted on: July 10, 2018
Managers require quantitative yet tractable tools that identify areas for restoration yielding effective benefits for targeted wildlife species and the ecosystems they inhabit.

Using DNA from hairs left at depredated greater sage-grouse nests to detect mammalian nest predators

Publications Posted on: March 22, 2018
Despite a multitude of studies on sage-grouse (Centrocercus spp.), there is still sparse information on the predator communities that influence sage-grouse productivity and how these predator communities may change when sagebrush habitats are altered by human activities. As a proof-of-concept, we used mammalian hairs collected at depredated greater sage-grouse (C.

Effects of climate change on wildlife in the Northern Rockies [Chapter 8]

Publications Posted on: September 22, 2017
Few data exist on the direct effects of climatic variability and change on animal species. Therefore, projected climate change effects must be inferred from what is known about habitat characteristics and the autecology of each species.

The Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy Actionable Science Plan: U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington D.C.

Publications Posted on: December 08, 2016
The Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy (hereafter Strategy, DOI 2015) outlined the need for coordinated, science-based adaptive management to achieve long-term protection, conservation, and restoration of the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystem. A key component of this management approach is the identification of knowledge gaps that limit implementation of effective strategies to meet current management challenges.

A science-based framework to develop effective management strategies for addressing threats to sagebrush ecosystems and sage-grouse

FS News Posted on: November 29, 2016
The report, Using Resilience and Resistance Concepts to Manage Threats to Sagebrush Ecosystems, Gunnison Sage-Grouse, and Greater Sage-Grouse in Their Eastern Range: A Strategic Multi-Scale Approach, allows managers to predict how sagebrush ecosystems will respond to both disturbance and management actions in areas that support sage-grouse. Using this approach, managers can better assess habitat threats, target areas for treatment, and develop appropriate management strategies.

Beyond the single species climate envelope: A multifaceted approach to mapping climate change vulnerability

Publications Posted on: October 04, 2016
Federal land management agencies and conservation organizations have begun incorporating climate change vulnerability assessments (CCVAs) as an important component in the management and conservation of landscapes. It is often a challenge to translate that knowledge into management plans and actions, even when research infers species risk.

Forest Service science bolsters sagebrush and sage-grouse conservation

Media Gallery Posted on: September 16, 2016
Sagebrush ecosystems are among the largest and most threatened ecosystems in North America. Greater sage-grouse has served as the bellwether for species conservation in these ecosystems and has been considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act several times. The 2016 Conservation and restoration of sagebrush ecosystems and sage-grouse: An assessment of USDA Forest Service Science assessment will help meet continuing widespread concerns and calls for science-based conservation to mitigate threats to sagebrush ecosystems, conserve populations of sage-grouse and other sagebrush-obligate species, and restore sagebrush ecosystems throughout the western United States. 

Sagebrush scent identifies species and subspecies

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 24, 2016
Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) is the dominant plant species across much of the Western U.S. and provide critical habitat and food for many endemic species, including the threatened greater sage-grouse. Sagebrush habitat is imperiled due to disturbances and increased wildfire frequency due to exotic annual grasses. Identification of big sagebrush subspecies is difficult, but critical for successful restoration. Researchers discover that volatiles emitted by sagebrush species and subspecies differ in consistent ways and can be used to accurately identify plants.

Forest Service science bolsters sagebrush and sage-grouse conservation

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 19, 2016
USDA Forest Service (FS) has been a leader for several decades in developing science and applications to support conservation and restoration of sagebrush ecosystems and sage-grouse populations. This spotlight describes an assessment that explains how and why understanding and supporting FS science is crucial for future management of sagebrush ecosystems.

Wildflowers are key to sagebrush restoration

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 17, 2016
Focusing on wildflowers (forbs) during restoration work in the western sagebrush ecosystem can benefit sage-grouse, pollinators, and the iconic Monarch butterfly. Can a more holistic approach be taken to maximize the effectivness of wildlife conservation? Outplanting forb seedlings in high-density islands may be a way to accelerate the pace of restoration, reduce the amount of seeds required, and provide critical linkage among remaining high-quality sagebrush habitat.

Pages