You are here

Keyword: restoration

Back from the brink: Framework to sustain resilience to species at risk

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 14, 2019
The Regeneration for Resilience (R4R) framework provides a decision structure to prioritize limited resources and utilize seedling planting and natural regeneration management to offer the best likelihood of success in positioning stands and landscapes to support resilience self-sustaining tree populations that are threatened by invasive pests. Effective management of forest regeneration dynamics can increase forest resilience and adaptive capacity to mitigate impacts of invasive species.

Integration and tradeoffs [Chapter 9]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
Managing for sagebrush ecosystems that are resilient to disturbance and resistant to invasive plants often requires managers to make tough decisions in the face of considerable complexity and uncertainty. The decisionmaking environment is often characterized by multiple management objectives, limited management authority and capabilities, dynamic ecosystems and plant communities, and uncertain responses to management actions.

Wild horse and burro considerations [Chapter 8]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
Wild horses (Equus caballus) and wild burros (E. asinus), like domestic livestock, can alter sagebrush ecosystem structure and composition and affect habitat quality for sagebrush dependent species (Beever and Aldridge 2011). The presence of Federally protected wild horses and wild burros can also have substantial effects on the capacity for habitat restoration efforts to achieve conservation and restoration goals.

Livestock grazing management [Chapter 7]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
Part 1 of the Science Framework identifies livestock grazing as the most widespread land use in the sagebrush biome (Chambers et al. 2017a; hereafter, Part 1). In the Conservation Objectives Team Report (USDOI FWS 2013) improper livestock grazing is considered a present and widespread threat to Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, GRSG) for most GRSG populations.

Application of national seed strategy concepts [Chapter 6]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
Native plant species are the foundation of sagebrush ecosystems and provide essential habitat for wildlife species, such as Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, GRSG).

Invasive plant management [Chapter 5]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
One of the most significant stressors to the sagebrush biome is expansion and dominance of nonnative ecosystem-transforming species, particularly invasive annual and perennial plants.

Wildland fire and vegetation management [Chapter 4]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
Wildland fire has always been an important ecosystem process across the sagebrush biome. Recently, the scale of sagebrush ecosystem loss and fragmentation has increased due to a combination of uncharacteristic wildland fire, invasive annual grasses, juniper (Juniperus spp.) and piñon (Pinus spp.) expansion, and anthropogenic land use and development.

Climate adaptation [Chapter 3]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
Management actions that enable adaptation to climate change and promote resilience to disturbance are becoming increasingly important in the sagebrush biome. In recent decades temperatures have increased, growing seasons have lengthened, and in many areas the timing and amount of precipitation has changed (Chambers et al. 2017 [hereafter, Part 1], section 4; Kunkel et al. 2013a,b,c).

Adaptive management and monitoring [Chapter 2]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
Monitoring programs designed to track ecosystem changes in response to both stressors and disturbances use repeated observations of ecosystem attributes. Such programs can increase our understanding of how interactions among resilience to disturbance, resistance to invasive species, and “change agents” including management actions influence resource conditions (or status) and trends and outcomes of conservation and restoration actions.

Overview of the Science Framework [Chapter 1]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
The Science Framework is part of an unprecedented conservation effort underway across 11 States in the western United States to address threats to sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystems and the species that depend on them. Sagebrush ecosystems provide a large diversity of habitats and support more than 350 species of vertebrates (Suring et al. 2005).

Pages